Plot analysis worksheet pdf

Plot analysis worksheet pdf DEFAULT

Story Structure Worksheets

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.2.5 – Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.5 – Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.5 – Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.5 – Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.5 – Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.5 – Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.5 – Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5 – Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.5 – Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

Sours: https://www.ereadingworksheets.com/free-reading-worksheets/story-structure/story-structure-worksheets/

5.G.A.1 5th Grade Plot Data And Analyze Trends Worksheets PDF

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Sours: https://www.tutorified.com/5-g-a-1-5th-grade-plot-data-and-analyze-trends-worksheets-pdf/
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Print Plot Worksheets

The literary term plot is used to sum up all the major events that take place throughout a story. This is often in the form of a major conflict or struggle between characters or their environment. The plot normal follows a sequence or pattern. Depending on the work the pattern may be predictable. Most highly esteemed works will have an unpredictable plot or at least a twist that was not easy for the reader to see coming. The plot normally ends in some form of resolution. Even stories that are carried over several works will form a resolution on sub-plots before ending a work. Most stories follow the same basic structure. They start by introducing the characters, setting, and central conflict (exposition), contain events that build in scope (rising action) until the "big event" (climax), after which, various conflicts are dealt with (falling action) until the end, where the lessons are learned or all conflicts are dealt with (resolution).

These worksheets will have your students mapping essential elements of children's stories and fables to this pattern. Students will be required to pinpoint actions in very well-known works. We ask students to identify the exposition where a great deal of background information is shared. They will then identify the rising action where the main challenge is identified. The middle of the work will often result in a climax where tensions are their highest. As the resolution starts to take shape a falling action is able to be found. The story normally will end in a resolution to the conflict or challenge. Answer keys are provided as you might find them very helpful when grading. Fun Project Idea: Have your students bring in their favorite books or stories and perform the same exercise, and present the result to the class.

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Goldy Locks and the Three Bears

Below are the main components of Goldy Locks and the Three Bears. Place each component where it belongs on the Plot Diagram by placing its number in the circle.

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The Plot of Gingerbread Man

Which is it? 1. The gingerbread man came to a river that he could not cross.   2. An old woman who lived in a cottage baked a gingerbread man. 3. The fox ate the gingerbread man.

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The Plot of Henny Penny

Where do these fit into the scheme of the story? 1. Foxy Loxy told them that he would show them a shortcut to the king. 2. She ran to tell the king that the sky was falling. 3. She turned around and went back to her farmyard, never to give the king her message. 4. Henny Penny and all of her friends ran into Foxy Loxy who said he wanted to go with them.

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The Little Red Hen

1. The little red hen ate the bread all by herself, enjoying every bite. 2. The little red hen did all the work while the other three lazed around all day and refused to help. 3. When the bread was done, the pig, the duck, and the cat all said that they were ready to eat it. 4. The pig, the duck, and the cat refused to help plant the corn.

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The Three Little Pigs Plot

Place each component where it belongs on the Plot Diagram by placing its number in the circle. For example: 1. The first pig built his house of straw, and the big bad wolf came and blew it down. 2. The big bad wolf got mad about the pigs tricking him, so he decided to go down the chimney of the pigs' brick house and eat them for dinner. 3. The first pig went to live with the second pig, whose home was built of sticks, until the big bad wolf blew it down also.

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The Plot of Little Red Riding Hood

1. Little Red Riding Hood met a wolf in the woods and told him that she was going to visit her grandmother. 2. Little Red Riding Hood arrived for her visit, not realizing that it was the wolf dressed as her grandmother. 3. A woodsman heard her scream, came to rescue her, and made the wolf spit out the grandmother.

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The Plot of Rumpelstiltskin

1. Once she was Queen, she had a baby that the little man came to get. 2. A miller told the King that his daughter could spin straw into gold; therefore, the King asked that she be brought to the palace and show what she could do. 3. The little man told her that she had three days to guess his name, or the baby became his.

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The Princess and the Pea Worksheet

1. When asked how she slept, she said that she felt something hard under her and was black and blue from it. 2. A prince wanted to marry a real princess, but was unable to find one. 3. The queen decided to test her and see if she was a real princess.

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Sours: https://www.easyteacherworksheets.com/langarts/plot.html
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Characters, plot, setting and the author's purpose

These worksheets focus on the basic elements of stories including characters, plot and setting.

Choose your grade / topic:

Grade 1 - Story Elements Worksheets

Identify the characters, setting and main plot of short texts.

Grade 2 - Character, Setting and Plot Worksheets

Identify characters, setting and plot, including the character's "problem" and its solution.

Grade 3 - Basics of Storytelling

Identify characters, setting, plot and author's purpose.

Grade 4 Author's Purpose Worksheets

Analyze the author's purpose in writing selected texts.

Grade 5 - Elements of a Story

Analyze characters, settings, plots and author's purpose.

Sample Story Elements Worksheet

Sample Story Elements Worksheet

Sours: https://www.k5learning.com/reading-comprehension-worksheets/topics/story-elements

Pdf plot analysis worksheet

Story Elements Worksheets

Every story has basic components: characters, setting, plot, theme, and conflict. These elements answer the basic questions: Who? What? When? Where? Why? and How? By understanding each of these components, students are better able to analyze and appreciate the author’s work. You’ll find our story elements worksheets listed below. Click on the title to view, download, or print the PDF. You may use them for free at home or in class. Be sure to check out all of our reading worksheets. If you're looking for more activities, check out www.readingvine.com's story elements reading passages.

Aesop: Put the Events in Order

Aesop: Put the Events in Order

Aesop was a Greek writer who wrote stories called fables. A fable is a story that gives a lesson at the end. Students read through a fable and put the events in order.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12, Kindergarten & 1st Grade
CCSS Code(s):
RL.1.3, RL.2.7, RL.3.5

Plot Actions Helper

Plot Actions Helper

Starting at the top of the castle, students write the first action in the story. Below that they write the second action, then the third, and then the fourth.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12, Kindergarten & 1st Grade
CCSS Code(s):
RL.1.3, RL.2.7, RL.3.5

Who Is a Character?

Who Is a Character?

In this activity, students read the sentence and then circle the word that describes the character.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12, Kindergarten & 1st Grade
CCSS Code(s):
RL.K, RL.1, RL.2

Build a Plot: Connect the Paragraphs

Build a Plot: Connect the Paragraphs

This worksheet includes the opening of a story and the end of a story. Students decide what the problem is, then what the steps, or plot actions, should be to link the beginning of the story with the end.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RL.2.7, RL.3.5

Build a Plot: Write the Steps

Build a Plot: Write the Steps

Students read the opening and ending of a story, and decide what the problem is, then what the steps, or plot actions, should be to link the beginning of the story with the end.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RL.2.7, RL.3.5

Put the Plot in Order

Put the Plot in Order

The teacher cuts out each plot action card and mixes them up. The student puts the cards in the correct order.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RL.1.3, RL.2.7, RL.3.5

Story Elements Form

Story Elements Form

This is a more detailed story elements form template that includes boxes for character, setting, theme, problem, solution and plot/actions.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, 4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RL.2, RL.3, RL.4, RL.5

Story Elements Helper

Story Elements Helper

Thisis a helpful template for elementary school students. It provides a box for different story elements like character, setting, plot and theme.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, 4th and 5th Grade
CCSS Code(s):
RL.2, RL.3, RL.4, RL.5

Story Elements: Problem and Solution

Story Elements: Problem and Solution

A story element activity that asks students to read short passages and write down the problem and the solution.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, 4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RL.3, RL.4

Story Elements: What’s the Setting?

Story Elements: What’s the Setting?

In this story elements worksheet for elementary school grades, students read the passages and write the setting.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, 4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RL.3, RL.4

Using Story Elements: Plan a Story

Using Story Elements: Plan a Story

Planning a story can be tough. This activity helps students break things down so that it’s easier to envision and write the story. A great beginning writing activity for 3rd – 5th graders.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, 4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.3.3.A, W.4.3.A, W.5.3.A

Discovering the Elements of the Story

Discovering the Elements of the Story

This activity asks students to read a short passage in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and asking several story element questions.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RL.4, RL.5
Sours: https://www.k12reader.com/subject/reading-skills/story-elements/
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