Twitch stream delay 2018

Twitch stream delay 2018 DEFAULT

Question / Help How do I reduce Twitch Stream Delay?

Hi,

As the title suggests, I've been doing a lot of research on how to reduce my twitch stream delay. I currently have a single PC setup with i7 - k @ HZ + GTX Nvidia and for some reason, I get a 15 - 25 seconds delay when I stream a game like Assassin's Creed Syndicate.

When I stream, I typically have my twitch dashboard opened in a separate monitor so I can look at the chat. After several minutes, my live stream on my dashboard would lag and the gameplay would be about seconds behind what my real time actions are happening. This also happens with chat interaction where someone could be making a comment or asking a question and my responses are also delayed by a similar amount of time.

I know there will always be a delay, that's done on purpose with Twitch. But I do not have the same delay when I stream other games like World of Warcraft or League of Legends. In fact, I could stream these games at p, 5k bitrate and even faster CPU speed for higher quality, the delay is probably seconds (almost near-realtime).

So what I'm trying to figure out is how to reduce the delay when I stream games like Assassin's Creed Syndicate closer to that real-time. I am streaming this more CPU intensive game at p only and k bitrate.

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

 

Sours: https://obsproject.com/forum/threads/how-do-i-reduce-twitch-stream-delay/

How to fix Twitch audio delay issues &#; out of sync

Milan Stanojevic
by Milan Stanojevic

Windows & Software Expert

Milan has been enthusiastic about PCs ever since his childhood days, and this led him to take interest in all PC-related technologies. Before joining WindowsReport, he worked as a front-end web developer. Read more

  • Twitch is a popular streaming website dedicated to and made by gamers.
  • Unfortunately, many users have reported audio delays when watching Twitch streams.
  • To learn more about this service, check out our dedicated Twitch Fix Hub.
  • If you're a fan of streamed game content, you might also like our Streaming Hub as well.
twitch audio delay

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Twitch is a popular streaming service, but many users reported audio delay while watching Twitch. This problem can negatively impact your viewing experience, so today we’re going to show you how to fix this issue on your PC.

Twitch audio issues can be quite problematic, and speaking of audio issues, here are some common problems that users reported:

  • Twitch streaming audio out of sync, game audio out of sync – This issue can occur while streaming using OBS. To fix it, set the delay to your microphone in order to match the audio delay.
  • OBS audio out of sync – This issue usually occurs due to OBS settings, and many users reported that they fixed the problem by disabling the Use device timestamps option.
  • Twitch audio lagging behind video, audio lag – There are many causes that lead to these errors, and if you encounter them, be sure to try all of our solutions.

How do I fix audio delays in Twitch?

  1. Try using a different browser
  2. Disable HTML5 player
  3. Update your GPU drivers
  4. Refresh the page
  5. Switch between different modes
  6. Disable hardware acceleration
  7. Disable Fast Boot
  8. Disable Use Device Timestamps option
  9. Check your amount of RAM
  10. Set a delay on your webcam and microphone
  11. Try viewing the steam in Incognito mode

1. Try using a different browser

If your problems persist and you think that maybe your web browser might be to blame, then maybe it is time you try a different one.

Avid gamers may like to give Opera GX a try, the world&#;s first web browser created specifically for gamers.

Not only does it look fantastic thanks to the visuals powered by Razer Chroma, but it also features Twitch integrations, allowing for a better Twitch experience when viewing streams from it.

The web browser is also made using the incredibly stable Chromium engine, so any extensions that you may have used on Chrome or Edge will work on it as well.

More so, it is incredibly lightweight, and the GX Controls menu makes sure your browser never eats up too much of your RAM.

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2. Disable HTML5 player

  1. Open the desired stream in Twitch.
  2. Click the Gear icon below the video and then choose Advanced from the menu. Locate HTML5 Player option and disable it.
    html5 player twitch audio delay

According to users, sometimes audio delay in Twitch can appear due to HTML5 player. HTML5 almost completely replaced Adobe Flash on the web, but apparently some people are having issues with HTML5 player in Twitch.

To fix this problem, users are suggesting to disable HTML5 player in Twitch.

After doing that, the problem should be resolved and your audio issues will be fixed. Bear in mind that you might have to repeat this workaround for each stream that you want to play.


3. Update your GPU drivers

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Your GPU drivers are quite important, and if your drivers are corrupted or out of date, perhaps you’ll need to update them in order to fix audio delay issues in Twitch.

This is fairly simple to do, and the best way to do that is to visit your graphics card manufacturer’s website and download the latest drivers for your model. Once you download the latest drivers, install them and check if that solves your issue.

If you don’t want to manually update your drivers, you can always use third-party tools such as DriverFix to automatically update all your drivers with just a couple of clicks. Once your drivers are updated, check if the problem is still there.

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The program is fast and reliable, and with it, you&#;ll be just 2 clicks away from having your PC&#;s drivers updated to the latest versions.

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4. Refresh the page

Sometimes this problem can occur due to a glitch with the page you’re on. If there’s an audio delay on a specific stream, perhaps you can fix the problem simply by refreshing the stream page.

Alternatively, you can try pausing the stream for a couple of moments and then continue the playback in order to fix the problem. If that doesn’t work, you can also try closing the browser and opening the stream again.

These are some simple workarounds, but they might be able to help you with audio delay issues on Twitch, so be sure to try them out.


5. Switch between different modes

Run a System Scan to discover potential errors

Run a PC Scan with Restoro Repair Tool to find errors causing security problems and slowdowns. After the scan is complete, the repair process will replace damaged files with fresh Windows files and components.

If you’re having audio delay issues on Twitch, it might be possible to fix this problem simply by switching to a different viewing mode. According to users, to fix the issue you just have to try switching between regular, theater and full-screen viewing modes.

Several users reported that this method worked for them, so be sure to try it out and check if it works.


6. Disable hardware acceleration

  1. In the top right corner click the Menu
  2. Now choose Settings from the menu.
    twitch audio delay settings chrome
  3. When the Settings tab opens, scroll all the way down and click on Advanced.
    settings advanced twitch audio delay
  4. Locate the System section and disable Use hardware acceleration when available option.
    hardware acceleration disable twitch audio lay

According to users, sometimes this issue can occur due to problems with hardware acceleration in your browser. Hardware acceleration is a useful feature that utilizes your GPU in order to render content and improve your performance.

However, sometimes this feature can lead to audio delays and various other issues on Twitch. To fix the problem, many users are suggesting to disable hardware acceleration in your browser.

After disabling this feature, restart your browser to apply changes. Once your browser restarts, check if the problem is still there.


7. Disable Fast Boot

  1. Press Windows Key + S and type power settings in the search field.
  2. Choose Power & sleep settings from the list of results.
    power settings twitch audio lag
  3. In the right pane, go down to the Related settings section and click Additional power settings.
    advanced power settings twitch audio
  4. Power Options window should now appear. In the left pane, select Choose what the power button does.
    power button twitch audio lag
  5. Click on Change settings that are currently unavailable.
    change settings unavailable twitch audio lag
  6. Uncheck Turn on fast startup (recommended) option and click Save changes.
    fast startup disable twitch audio

According to users, this issue can be caused by the Fast Boot feature on Windows. This is a useful feature since it will allow your system to boot faster by putting it in a state similar to hibernation.

Although this feature is useful, some users claim that it’s causing audio issues on Twitch. To fix the problem, it’s advised to disable it completely.

After disabling this feature, the problems with audio delay in Twitch should be gone. Bear in mind that your system might boot slightly slower after disabling this feature.


8. Disable Use Device Timestamps option

  1. Open OBS and in the main screen click the Gear
  2. Now locate Use device timestamps option and disable it.

Some users reported audio delay issues on Twitch while streaming and using OBS. To fix this problem, it’s advised to change a single setting in OBS.

After doing that, check if the problem is resolved. If this feature is already disabled, try enabling it and check if that solves your problem.


9. Check your amount of RAM

 

RAM twitch audio lag

If you’re getting an audio delay while streaming on Twitch using OBS, perhaps the issue is related to the amount of RAM. According to users, this issue can appear if you don’t have enough RAM to comfortably run OBS.

This is an unlikely cause, but if the amount of RAM is the problem, perhaps you should consider purchasing more RAM.


Set a delay on your webcam and microphone

If you’re having an audio delay while streaming on Twitch, perhaps you can somewhat remedy the issue by adding offset to your webcam and microphone. To do that, go to the Settings page in OBS and look for your audio/video source and add offset to it.

After doing that, your webcam and microphone should be perfectly synced with the game audio. This might be a crude workaround, but several users reported that it worked for them, so you might want to try it out.


Try viewing the stream in Incognito mode

  1. Click the Menu icon in the top right corner of your browser.
  2. Now select New incognito window from the menu.
    incognito mode audio lag

If you can’t watch Twitch steam due to audio delay, perhaps you can try viewing it in Incognito mode. Many browsers have this feature, and this feature uses no add-ons or cache, so it’s perfect for troubleshooting issues.

After doing that, a new window will now appear. Visit the stream that you want to watch in the new window and check if the issue is still there.

If the problem doesn’t appear in Incognito mode, the issue is most likely related to one of your extensions or your cache, so be sure to clear the cache and disable all extensions.

Audio delay issues in Twitch can negatively impact your viewing experience, but if you’re having this problem, be sure to try all of our solutions.


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Twitch buffering issues can cause many problems while watching your favorite streams, but you can easily fix this with a few easy tweaks. Read More

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Sours: https://windowsreport.com/twitch-audio-delay/
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Twitch (service)

Live-streaming platform

Twitch is an American video live streaming service that focuses on video game live streaming, including broadcasts of esports competitions. In addition, it offers music broadcasts, creative content, and more recently, "in real life" streams. It is operated by Twitch Interactive, a subsidiary of Amazon.com, Inc.[2] It was introduced in June as a spin-off of the general-interest streaming platform Justin.tv. Content on the site can be viewed either live or via video on demand.

The popularity of Twitch eclipsed that of its general-interest counterpart. In October , the website had 45 million unique viewers,[3] and by February , it was considered the fourth largest source of peak Internet traffic in the United States. At the same time, Justin.tv's parent company was re-branded as Twitch Interactive to represent the shift in focus&#;– Justin.tv was shut down in August That month, the service was acquired by Amazon for US$ million,[4][5] which later led to the introduction of synergies with the company's subscription service Amazon Prime. Twitch acquired Curse in , an operator of online video gaming communities[6] and introduced means to purchase games through links on streams along with a program allowing streamers to receive commissions on the sales of games that they play.

By , Twitch had more than million viewers per month.[7] In , Twitch remained the leading live streaming video service for video games in the US, and had an advantage over YouTube Gaming, which was shut down in [8][9] As of February&#;[update], it had 3 million broadcasters monthly and 15 million daily active users, with million average concurrent users.[10][11] As of May&#;[update], Twitch had over 27, partner channels.[10][12]

History

Founding and initial growth (–)

When Justin.tv was launched in by Justin Kan and Emmett Shear, the site was divided into several content categories. The gaming category grew especially fast, and became the most popular content on the site.[13] In June ,[3]:&#;40&#; the company decided to spin off the gaming content as TwitchTV, inspired by the term twitch gameplay. It launched officially in public beta on June 6, [14] Since then, Twitch has attracted more than 35 million unique visitors a month.[15][16] Twitch had about 80 employees in June ,[17] which increased to by December [3] The company was headquartered in San Francisco's Financial District.[3]

Twitch has been supported by significant investments of venture capital, with US$15 million in (on top of US$7 million originally raised for Justin.tv),[18][19] and US$20 million in [20] Investors during three rounds of fund raising leading up to the end of included Draper Associates, Bessemer Venture Partners and Thrive Capital.[3]:&#;40&#; In addition to the influx of venture funding, it was believed in that the company had become profitable.[3]:&#;40&#;

Especially since the shutdown of its direct competitor Own3d.tv in early , Twitch has become the most popular e-sports streaming service by a large margin, leading some to conclude that the website has a "near monopoly on the market".[21] Competing video services, such as YouTube and Dailymotion, began to increase the prominence of their gaming content to compete, but have had a much smaller impact so far.[22][23] As of mid, there were over 43 million viewers on Twitch monthly, with the average viewer watching an hour and a half a day.[24] By February , Twitch was the fourth largest source of Internet traffic during peak times in the United States, behind Netflix, Google, and Apple. Twitch made up % of total US Internet traffic during peak periods.[25]

In late , particularly due to increasing viewership, Twitch had issues with lag and low frame rates in Europe.[26] Twitch has subsequently added new servers in the region.[27] Also in order to address these problems, Twitch implemented a new video system shown to be more efficient than the previous system. Initially, the new video system was criticized by users because it caused a significant stream delay, interfering with broadcaster-viewer interaction.[28] Twitch staff said that the increased delay was likely temporary and at the time, was an acceptable tradeoff for the decrease in buffering.[29]

Growth, YouTube acquisition speculation ()

On February 10, , Twitch's parent company (Justin.tv, Inc.) was renamed Twitch Interactive, reflecting the increased prominence of the service over Justin.tv as the company's main business.[30] That same month, a stream known as Twitch Plays Pokémon, a crowdsourced attempt to play Pokémon Red using a system translating chat commands into game controls, went viral. By February 17, the channel reached over million total views and averaged concurrent viewership between 60 and 70 thousand viewers with at least 10% participating. Vice President of Marketing Matthew DiPietro praised the stream as "one more example of how video games have become a platform for entertainment and creativity that extends WAY beyond the original intent of the game creator. By merging a video game, live video and a participatory experience, the broadcaster has created an entertainment hybrid custom made for the Twitch community. This is a wonderful proof of concept that we hope to see more of in the future."[31][32] Beginning with its edition, Twitch was made the official live streaming platform of the Electronic Entertainment Expo.[33]

On May 18, , Variety first reported that Google had reached a preliminary deal to acquire Twitch through its YouTube subsidiary for approximately US$1 billion.[34][35][36][37][38]

On August 5, , the original Justin.tv site suddenly ceased operations, citing a need to focus resources entirely on Twitch.[39][40][41] On August 6, , Twitch introduced an updated archive system, with multi-platform access to highlights from past broadcasts by a channel, higher quality video, increased server backups, and a new Video Manager interface for managing past broadcasts and compiling "highlights" from broadcasts that can also be exported to YouTube. Due to technological limitations and resource requirements, the new system contained several regressions; the option to archive complete broadcasts on an indefinite basis ("save forever") was removed, meaning that they can only be retained for a maximum of 14 days, or 60 for partners and Turbo subscribers. While compiled highlights can be archived indefinitely, they were limited to two hours in length.[42][43] In addition, Twitch introduced a copyright fingerprinting system that would mute audio in archived clips if it detected a copyrighted song in the stream.

Amazon subsidiary (–present)

On August 25, , Amazon acquired Twitch Interactive for US$ million in an all-cash deal.[4][5] Sources reported that the rumoured Google deal had fallen through and allowed Amazon to make the bid, with Forbes reporting that Google had backed out of the deal due to potential antitrust concerns surrounding it and its existing ownership of YouTube.[44] The acquisition closed on September 25, [45]Take-Two Interactive, which owned a 2% stake at the time of the acquisition, made a windfall of $22 million.[46]

Under Amazon, Shear continued as chief executive officer of Twitch Interactive, with Sara Clemens added to the executive team as chief operating officer in January [47] Shear touted the Amazon Web Services platform as an "attractive" aspect of the deal, and that Amazon had "built relationships with the big players in media", which could be used to the service's advantage—particularly in the realm of content licensing. The purchase of Twitch marked the third recent video gaming–oriented acquisition by Amazon, which had previously acquired the developers Reflexive Entertainment and Double Helix Games.[48]

On December 9, , Twitch announced it had acquired GoodGame Agency, an organisation that owns the esports teams Evil Geniuses and Alliance.[49][50] In March , Twitch reset all user passwords and disabled all connections to external Twitter and YouTube accounts after the service reported that someone had gained "unauthorised access" to the user information of some Twitch users.[51]

In June , Twitch added a new feature known as "Cheering", a special form of emoticon purchased as a microtransaction using an in-site currency known as "Bits".[52] Bits are bought using Amazon Payments, and cheers act as donations to the channel. Users also earn badges within a channel based on how much they have cheered.[53]

On August 16, , Twitch acquired Curse, Inc., an operator of online video gaming communities and gaming-oriented VoIP software.[6] In December , GoodGame Agency was divested by Amazon to their respective members due to conflict of interest concerns.[54] On September 30, , Twitch announced Twitch Prime, a service which provides premium features that are exclusive to users who have an active Amazon Prime subscription. This included advertising-free streaming, monthly offers of free add-on content ("Game Loot"), and game discounts.[55] Games included with the game loot rewards were Apex Legends, Legends of Runeterra, FIFA Ultimate Team, Teamfight Tactics, Mobile Legends: Bang Bang, Doom Eternal, and more.[56]

In December , Twitch announced a semi-automated chat moderation tool (AutoMod), which uses natural language processing and machine learning to set aside potentially unwanted content for human review.[57] In February , Twitch announced the Twitch Game Store, a digital distribution platform that would expose digital purchases of games within the site's browsing interface. When streaming games available on the store, partnered channels could display a referral link to purchase the game—receiving a 5% commission. Users also received a "Twitch Crate" on every purchase, which included Bits and a collection of random chat emotes.[58][59][60]

In August , Twitch announced it had acquired video indexing platform ClipMine.[61]

On August 20, , Twitch announced that it will no longer offer advertising-free access to the entire service to Amazon Prime subscribers, with this privilege requiring the separate "Twitch Turbo" subscription or an individual channel subscription. This privilege ended for new customers effective September 14, , and for existing customers October [62] In October , Twitch announced Amazon Blacksmith, a new extension allowing broadcasters to configure displays of products associated with their streams with Amazon affiliate links.[63] On November 27, , Twitch discontinued the Game Store service, citing that it did not generate as much additional revenue for partners as they hoped, and new revenue opportunities such as Amazon Blacksmith. Users retain access to their purchased games.[64]

Twitch acquired the Internet Games Database (IGDB), a user-driven website similar in functionality to Internet Movie Database (IMDb) to catalog details of video games in September Twitch plans to use the database service to improve its own internal search features and help users find games they are interested in.[65] On September 26, , Twitch unveiled a new logo and updated site design. The design is accompanied by a new advertising campaign, "You're already one of us", which will seek to promote the platform's community members.[66] Twitch began signing exclusivity deals with high-profile streamers in December [67][68]

Twitch introduced a Safety Advisory Council in May , made up from streamers, academics, and think tanks, with a goal to develop guidelines for moderation, work-life balance, and safeguarding the interests of marginalized communities for the platform.[69] In August , Twitch Prime was renamed Prime Gaming, aligning it closer with the Amazon Prime family of services.[70]

In May , Twitch announced that it would introduce over new tags to categorize streams, including finer tags for gender identity, sexual identity, and disabilities, as well as tags for other types of themes (such as virtual streamers). The disability and LGBT-oriented tags were developed in consultation with the video game accessibility charities AbleGamers and SpecialEffect, and the LGBT organizations GLAAD and The Trevor Project.[71]

On October 6, , an anonymous hacker reportedly leaked "the entirety" of Twitch, including its source code of the Twitch client and APIs, and details of the payouts made to almost million streamers since August [72][73] The user posted a GB torrent link to 4chan and said that the leak, which includes source code from almost 6, internal Gitrepositories, is also "part one" of a larger release.[72][74][75] The leak also included details of plans for a digital storefront under the codename of "Vapor" meant to be a competitor to Steam.[76] Twitch verified they had suffered a data leak which they attributed to a server misconfiguration used by a "malicious third party".[77][78] While Twitch found no indication of login credentials or credit card information to have been taken in the breach, the company reset all stream keys as a precaution.[79][80]

Content and audience

Twitch is designed to be a platform for content, including esports tournaments, personal streams of individual players, and gaming-related talk shows.[81] A number of channels do live speedrunning.[82] The Twitch homepage currently displays games based on viewership.[24][83] As of June&#;[update], some of the most popular games streamed on Twitch are Fortnite, League of Legends, Dota 2, PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, Hearthstone, Overwatch and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive with a combined total of over million hours watched.[84]

Twitch has also made expansions into non-gaming content; such as in July , the site streamed a performance of 'Fester's Feast' from San Diego Comic-Con, and on July 30, , electronic dance music act Steve Aoki broadcast a live performance from a nightclub in Ibiza.[85][86][87][88] In January , Twitch introduced an official category for music streams, such as radio shows and music production activities, and in March , announced that it would become the new official live streaming partner of the Ultra Music Festival, an electronic music festival in Miami.[89][90]

On October 28, , Twitch launched a second non-gaming category, "Creative", which is intended for streams showcasing the creation of artistic and creative works. To promote the launch, the service also streamed an eight-day marathon of Bob Ross'The Joy of Painting.[91] In July , Twitch launched "Social eating" as a beta; it was inspired by the Korean phenomenon of Muk-bang and Korean players having engaged in the practice as intermissions on their gaming streams.[92]

In March , Twitch added an "IRL" category, which is designed for content within Twitch guidelines that does not fall within any of the other established categories on the site (such as lifelogs).[93]GeekWire reported that "while gameplay still makes up the vast majority of the content broadcast via Twitch, the 'Just Chatting' category — a catch-all term that encompasses anything from candid conversation to reality programming — took the top spot by a comfortable margin overall in December []. While the category has been on the rise for the last couple of months, this was the first time that it’s actually achieved No. 1 overall for a tracked period on the platform".[94]

In , Thrillist described Twitch as "talk radio for the extremely online".[95] Michael Espinosa, for Business Insider in , highlighted that "Twitch dominates the live content space, with 17 billion hours watched last year (per StreamElements), compared to YouTube Gaming Live's 10 billion (per the company). But the vast majority of gaming content is still consumed on-demand, where YouTube is the clear leader with over billion hours watched last year".[96]

Streamers

See also: Parasocial interaction §&#;Twitch, and List of most-followed Twitch channels

Streamer Ninja had been among Twitch's top personalities, with over 14 million followers. In August , however, Ninja announced that he would move exclusively to a Microsoft-owned competitor, Mixer.[97][98][99] After Ninja left, the top three streamers in October based on follower count were Tfue ( million followers), Shroud ( million followers) and TSM Myth ( million followers).[] Twitch began signing exclusivity deals with high-profile streamers in December , starting with DrLupo, TimTheTatman, and Lirik, who had a combined million followers at the time.[67]Dr DisRespect signed a multi-year deal in March [68] In May , Twitch signed popular streamers Summit1g, dakotaz and JoshOG to multi-year exclusive deals.[][] On June 26, , Dr DisRespect was banned from Twitch for unexplained reasons and his channel was removed from the site.[] Following the discontinuation of Mixer in late-July , both Ninja and Shroud (who had also defected to the service) re-signed exclusively with Twitch.[][][]

As of March&#;[update], there have been four streamers to have reached over , concurrent subscribers. These streamers are Ninja, Shroud, Ranboo, and Ludwig Ahgren.[] In April , Business Insider reported that "over the past 31 days, Ahgren has streamed non-stop in an attempt to break the record of , subscribers held by gaming personality Tyler 'Ninja' Blevins. By the end of the month-long stream, Ahgren had over , subscribers on his channel. [] At one point during his sleep cycle, his channel had the most concurrent viewers of any on the platform".[] In August , DrLupo left Twitch for an exclusivity deal with YouTube;[] TimTheTatman did the same in September [][96] Nathan Grayson, for The Washington Post, commented that when streamers moved to Mixer in , Twitch quickly locked down multiple streamers in exclusivity deals; however, streamers who moved to Mixer saw their audiences undergo "a marked downsizing. [] It demonstrated that many viewers within Twitch’s ecosystem, when deprived of their favorite big streamers, will just find other Twitch streamers to take their place. [] Now Twitch is bargaining from a place of confidence. That allows it to reevaluate previous deals made when streamers had more leverage".[] Grayson reported that lower offers from Twitch coupled with Twitch's higher streaming hour requirement ("YouTube’s contracts start at hours of streaming time per month while Twitch’s start at ") has made YouTube's exclusivity deals "tantalizing" to some Twitch streamers. Grayson wrote that "Ryan Wyatt, head of YouTube Gaming, said that allowing streamers to have a better work–life balance is a big priority for him"; DrLupo cited work–life balance as part of his decision to leave Twitch.[]

In analysis of the October data leak, multiple news outlets reported that the three top-earning Twitch content creators are Critical Role ($9,,), XQc ($8,,), and Summit1g ($5,,).[73][][][76][] Sisi Jiang, for Kotaku, reported that "excluding streams that are run by multiple people (such as Critical Role), there are no women in the top third of top-earning Twitch content creators"; in total, there are only three women in the top and only one is a woman of color. Jiang highlighted that these streamers are "Valorant streamer Pokimane at 39th place, cosplayer Amouranth at 48th, and music streamer Sintica at 71st" and commented that "in spite of the complaints about the 'hot tub meta,' 'titty streamers,' and how some male streamers perceive that female streamers are stealing views from men, the numbers show that only a small percentage of women are among the ranks of Twitch’s highest-earning content creators".[]

Users

It was reported in the early s that the typical Twitch viewer is male and aged between 18 and 34 years of age, although the site has also made attempts at pursuing other demographics, including women.[24][83] By , Twitch had more than million viewers per month.[7] In , Twitch remained the leading live streaming video service for video games in the US.[8][9]GeekWire reported that "while Twitch’s overall share of the streaming market has been steadily diminishing over the course of the year, from percent in December of to 61 percent at the end of the , the steady growth of the overall market means that the overall amount of content watched on the service has done nothing but increase".[94] The journal article World of Streaming. Motivation and Gratification on Twitch reported the results of a Twitch user survey in [] In ranking user motivations on the use of Twitch, users were motivated (in descending order) to watch Twitch: "to be entertained", "to follow gaming events", and to "have an alternative for television". Motivations classified as "socialization" and "information" ranked lower than motivations classified as "entertainment".[]

As of February&#;[update], it had 3 million broadcasters monthly and 15 million daily active users, with million average concurrent users.[10][11]Statista, a company specializing in market and consumer data, reported that "as of May , users in their teens and twenties accounted for more than three-quarters of Twitch's active app user accounts in the United States. According to recent data users aged 20 to 29 years, accounted for percent of the video streaming app's user base on the Android platform".[] They also reported that the "distribution of Twitch users in the United States as of 2nd quarter " was 75% male and 25% female.[]

Twitch allows anyone to watch a live broadcast and does not require viewers to log in.[] Users also have the option to follow and subscribe (also know as subbing) to streamers. Following is a free option, similar to other platforms such as Instagram and Twitter, where the user will see their followed streamers on the front page of Twitch when signed in and can receive notifications of specific broadcasts.[][][] Subscribing is a way for users to financially support streamers in exchange for exclusive benefits determined by the individual streamer.[][][] Users who link their Twitch account to their Amazon Prime account gain access to Prime Gaming which includes one complimentary Twitch subscription per month that the user can assign to the streamer of their choice.[62][70][] The aforementioned academic survey stated that % of users "spent money on Twitch"; of those users, % "donated to a streamer", % subscribed to a streamer and % "did both". The majority of these users stated the "main motivation is to support a streamer financially".[] Twitch's Terms of Service does not allow people under 13 years of age to use its services. Additionally, people who are at least 13 years old but below the age of majority in their jurisdiction (18 in most jurisdictions), may only use the services under the supervision or permission of a parent or other legal guardian who agrees to abide to the Terms of Service.[]

Charity

Broadcasters on Twitch often host streams promoting and raising money towards charity. By , the website has hosted events which, in total, raised over US$8 million in donations for charitable causes, such as Extra Life [] As of , Twitch has raised over US$75 million in donations for charitable causes.[] The biggest charity event of Twitch is Zevent, a French project created by Adrien Nougaret and Alexandre Douchary, with more than US$ million raised for Amnesty International in October

Esports

See also: Twitch Rivals

ESL tournaments have aired on Justin.tv and later Twitch.tv since [] The platform has also been a longtime broadcaster of the Evolution Championship Series.[][]

Twitch has been the official broadcaster of the League of Legends World Championship since ,[] as well as other League of Legends tournaments organized by Riot Games.

Dota 2's premier tournament The International has been livestreamed on Twitch since []

The platform airs Rocket League tournaments organized by Psyonix since [] The ELeague also broadcasts events on Twitch since [][]

Twitch and Blizzard Entertainment signed a two-year deal in June to make Twitch be the exclusive streaming broadcaster of select Blizzard esports championship events, with viewers under Twitch Prime earning special rewards in various Blizzard games.[] Twitch also reached a deal in to be the streaming partner of the Overwatch League, with the site also offering an "All-Access Pass" with exclusive content, emotes, and in-game items for Overwatch.[][] Blizzard switched to rival platform YouTube in []

Fortnite Battle Royale competitions have aired on Twitch since its launch in , including the E3 Fortnite Pro-Am and the Fortnite World Cup.[][]

The NBA 2K League has been livestreamed on Twitch since its inception in []

As the COVID pandemic suspended motorsports competitions around the world, several series launched sim racing competitions with real-life professional drivers. Some series had official broadcasts on Twitch, such as Formula One and IMSA.[] Many drivers also had their personal live streams on Twitch, as was the case of several eNASCAR iRacing Pro Invitational Series and INDYCAR iRacing Challenge drivers.[][]

Professional sports

In December , the National Basketball Association announced that it would stream NBA G League games on Twitch starting on December 15; the broadcasts also include interactive statistics overlays, as well as additional streams of the games with commentary by Twitch personalities.[] In April , it was announced that Twitch would carry eleven National Football LeagueThursday Night Football games, as part of the league's renewed streaming deal with Amazon Prime Video. During the season, these streams were exclusive to Amazon Prime subscribers.[]

In January , professional wrestling promotion Impact Wrestling announced that it would stream its weekly show Impact! on Twitch, in simulcast with the television airing on the U.S. cable network Pursuit Channel (co-owned with the promotion's parent company Anthem Sports & Entertainment).[]

On September 5, , the National Women's Hockey League announced a three-year broadcast rights deal with Twitch, covering all games and league events. The deal also contained an agreement with the NWHL Players' Association for revenue sharing with players, and marked the first time that the NWHL had ever received a rights fee.[] The National Women's Soccer League announced a three-year deal in March for Twitch to stream 24 matches per-season in the United States and Canada, collaborate on original content, and serve as the rightsholder for all matches outside of the United States and Canada.[][]

On June 20, , as an extension of Prime Video's local rights to the league, a plan to air all of the remaining matches of the –20 season (for the resumption of play due to the COVID pandemic and matches being played behind closed doors), and a plan for some of these matches to be carried free-to-air, it was announced that Twitch would stream a package of four Premier League soccer matches within the United Kingdom.[][]

On July 16, , U.S. radio broadcaster Entercom announced a partnership to stream video simulcasts of programs from some of their major-market sports talk stations on Twitch channels.[] On July 22, , Twitch officially launched a Sports category, primarily playing host to content streamed by sports leagues and teams on the platform.[]

The Copa América association football tournament aired in Spain on Twitch, under a partnership with Gerard Piqué's media company Kosmos and streamer Ibai Llanos.[]

Emotes

Twitch features a large number of emotes. There are emotes free for all users, emotes for Turbo users, emotes for Twitch Prime users, and emotes for users who are subscribed to Twitch partners or affiliates.[] As of October&#;,[update]Kappa was the most used emote on Twitch.[][] Twitch partnered broadcasters unlock more "emote slots" as they gain more subscribers up to a maximum of 50 emotes per channel.[]

On January 6, , Twitch announced that they had removed the PogChamp emote, the third most-used emote on the platform in ,[] typically used to express excitement, joy or shock.[][][] The decision was made in response to comments from the streamer Ryan "Gootecks" Gutierrez, the face of the emote, supporting civil unrest during the storming of the United States Capitol for the death of a protestor.[][][][][] Twitch plans to ask the community for a suitable replacement for the emoticon.[][][] Twitch later announced that there would be a new PogChamp emote every 24 hours.[][][][][][] On February 12, Twitch viewers elected KomodoHype as the new permanent PogChamp emote.[]

Content moderation and restrictions

Copyrighted content

On August 6, , Twitch announced that all on-demand videos on Twitch became subject to acoustic fingerprinting using software provided by content protection company Audible Magic; if copyrighted music (particularly, songs played by users from outside of the game they are playing) is detected, the minute portion of the video which contains the music will be muted. Live broadcasts were not subject to these filters.[][] A system was available for those who believed they were inappropriately affected and had rights to the music they used to challenge the filtering.[] Twitch offered a selection of royalty-free music for streamers to use, which was expanded upon later in January [89] The audio filtering system, along with the lack of communication surrounding the changes in general, proved to be controversial among users. In a Reddit AMA, co-founder Emmett Shear admitted that his staff had "screwed up" and should have provided advance warning of the changes, and promised that Twitch had "absolutely no intention" of implementing audio filtering on live broadcasts.[]

In June , Twitch received a large wave of DMCA takedown notices aimed at year-old VODs and "clips" (short segments of streams that can be captured by users) that contain copyrighted music from to Twitch complied with the takedowns and also issued a number of copyright strikes against viewers. Concerned streamers were notified that they should remove all VODs and clips if not certain they did not contain copyrighted material. This provoked major backlash, both at the loss of prior content but also based on viability concerns due to an inability to review or even rapidly delete content. There were also complaints based that strikes were being issued on viewer-created clips, even where the streamer-created content was deleted.[][][]

On September 15, , Twitch signed a licensing agreement with the French performance society SACEM, allowing composers and publishers to collect royalties whenever their music is streamed in France. Twitch already had licensing deals with the American societies ASCAP, BMI, SESAC and Global Music Rights.[]

To address these issues and also build upon the growth of music-based content on Twitch, Twitch introduced an extension known as "Soundtrack" in September , which plays rights-cleared music with curated genre-based playlists. It is contained within a separate stream that is not recorded with the VODs,[] and had agreements with 24 music distributors and independent record labels at launch.[][][] A group of U.S. performance rights and music associations accused Twitch of designing Soundtrack in such a way as to avoid payment of mechanical and synchronization licenses — claims which Twitch has defended.[][]

In September , Twitch and the National Music Publishers' Association signed a creative partnership.[]

Mature content

Twitch users are not allowed to stream any game that is rated "Adults Only" (AO) in the United States by the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB), regardless of its rating in any other geographical region, and any game that contains "overtly sexual content" or "gratuitous violence", or content which violates the terms of use of third-party services.[][]

Twitch has also explicitly banned specific games from streaming, regardless of rating; this includes games such as BMX XXX, erogevisual novel games (such as Dramatical Murder), HuniePop, Rinse and Repeat, Second Life, and Yandere Simulator.[][][][] The banning of Yandere Simulator was criticized by YandereDev, the developer of the game. He believed that the game was being arbitrarily singled out with no explanation, as Twitch has not banned other games with similarly excessive sexual or violent content such as Mortal Kombat X, Grand Theft Auto, or The Witcher 3.[][]

Twitch took temporary action in May after channels related to the video game Artifact began to be used for inappropriate content. Artifact, a major game by Valve, had lost most of its audience in just months from its release, and by late May , several popular livestreamers commented that the total viewership for Artifact streams had dropped to near zero. In the days that followed, several streamers started to make streams purporting to be Artifact gameplay but was trolling or other off-topic content. Initially these new streams were playing with the viewers or were jokes, such as showing animal videos or League of Legends matches. After a few days, other Artifact channel streams appeared containing content that was against the terms of Twitch's use policy, including full copyrighted movies, pornography, Nazi propaganda, and at least one stream that showed the entirety of the shooter's video from the Christchurch mosque shootings. The titles of such streams were usually presented to imply they were showing other content while waiting in queue for Artifact matches as to appear legitimate. As word of these streams in the Artifact section grew, Twitch took action, deleting the account that streamed the Christchurch shooting.[] Twitch then took steps to temporarily ban new accounts from streaming until they can resolve the issue.[] By June , Twitch started taking legal actions against one hundred "John Doe" streamers in a California court, accusing them of trademark infringement, breach of contract, fraud, and unlawful use of the service that was harming and scaring away users of the service.[][]

In early , some streams began to use their Twitch channel to broadcast themselves from hot tubs while wearing swimsuits. Twitch considered these streams to be "not advertiser friendly", banning some of the more predominant channels that had taken this route. In May , Twitch clarified in a "Pools, Hot Tubs, and Beaches" post that it was not trying to discriminate against women or others through this action, but through content that they deemed to be "sexually suggestive".[] In June that year, Twitch also took similar action against users that performed yoga while at the same time made autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) sounds via their microphones, which Twitch also stated was approaching sexual content.[]

Hate speech and harassment

In February , Twitch updated its acceptable content policies to direct that any content that it deemed hateful be suspended from its platform.[]

In June , a number of women stepped forward with accusations towards several streamers on Twitch and other services related to sexual misconduct and harassment claims.[] Twitch stated it would review all reported incidents and comply with law enforcement in any investigative efforts. However, several popular streamers on Twitch's service believed that the platform could do more to evaluate the accused individuals, prevent incidents, and protect others in the future, and used June 24, as a Twitch blackout day, not streaming any content through Twitch to show their support.[] By the evening of June 24, , Twitch had placed several bans on the accounts of those accused after completing their investigation, and stated in a blog post they would be forwarding additional details to law enforcement.[]

Twitch temporarily suspended an account belonging to President Donald Trump's campaign on June 29, Twitch stated that "hateful conduct is not allowed" as the reason for the suspension.[]

Twitch announced a new policy towards harassment and hateful content in December that would take effect on January 22, , aimed to better protect marginalized users of the service. While the new policy is more strict, Twitch said that this also includes a larger sliding scale of remedies or punishments to better deal with edge cases, such as temporarily blocking one's channel for a short time rather than a full ban. The new rules include a ban on ‘racist emotes’, though the list of such emotes is not clarified yet, and imagery containing the Confederate Flag.[] The new policy included banning words that were considered sexual insults, such as "incel" and "virgin" when used for harassment. The banned words included "simp", which raised criticism by streamers and long time viewers. While its slang origins have defined "simp" derogatorily as "a man who invests a lot of time and energy into women who don't want him", the term had become common on Twitch as an insult related to men being nice to women on the service or simply to refer to a person with loyalty to another. Twitch, in response, clarified that penalties for using these terms would only be enforced if they were being used in harassment of other users.[][][][]

On December 4, , Twitch removed the "blind playthrough" tag due to concerns of ableism that it may be offensive to those who are visually impaired. Suggestions for non-offensive and more neutral labels include "first playthrough", "undiscovered," and "no spoilers."[]

A popular feature of Twitch is the ability to "raid" another channel, where multiple users, coordinated from a different Twitch channel or another social media service, all join a target channel to provide support and encouragement. This is typically used to help boost the popularity of the target channel, particularly if the raid is organized by a popular streamer. Twitch had officially supported this type of activity since with the ability for a streamer to send all of their viewers to another channel as a raid.[] However, around mid, new types of "hate raids" began to occur with increasing frequency on Twitch. In these cases, numerous users would flood a channel and its chat with messages of harassment and hate towards the streamer as a form of cyberbullying. Most of these users are typically from automated bots, which made it difficult for channel moderators to deal with the amount of messages.[] Despite warning Twitch about these hate raids, Twitch had shown little action towards stopping them, leading numerous streams to organize a "#ADayOffTwitch" on September 1, , as a form of protest in anticipation that Twitch will find ways to take action against them.[][] After acknowledging a problem with dealing with hate raids, Twitch launched a lawsuit in early September against two individuals they had determined to be responsible for managing several hate raids after permanently banning their accounts.[] At the end of September , Twitch introduced tools for streamers to be able to limit who may participate in their chat as to prevent hate raids. These tools allow streamers to limit chat to those that have verified their phone number or email with Twitch, as well as to those that have followed their channel for a minimum amount of time.[]

Internet censorship

Main article: Internet censorship in China

As of September 20, , the Twitch website is blocked and the app is blocked from the Apple App Store in China.[]

In India, Twitch was reportedly blocked by Reliance-owned telecommunication company Jio as well as internet service providers JioFiber and Hathway in September as some users were illegally streaming matches of Indian Premier League on the platform.[]

Partner and affiliate programs

In July , Twitch launched its Partner Program,[] which reached over 11, members by August []

Similar to the Partner Program of other video sites like YouTube, the Partner Program allows popular content producers to share in the advertisement revenue generated from their streams. Additionally, Twitch users can subscribe to partnered streamers' channels for US$ a month, often granting the user access to unique emoticons, live chat privileges, and other various perks. Twitch retains US$ of every US$ channel subscription, with the remaining US$ going directly to the partnered streamer.[] Although exceptions were made, Twitch previously required that prospective partners have an "average concurrent viewership of +", as well as a consistent streaming schedule of at least three days a week.[] However, since the launch of the 'Achievements' feature, there is a clearer "Path to Partnership" with trackable goals for concurrent viewership, duration and frequency of streams.[][]

In April , Twitch launched its "Affiliate Program" that allows smaller channels to generate revenue as well, also announcing that it would allow channels access to multi-priced subscription tiers.[][] The participants of this program get some but not all of the benefits of the Twitch Partners. Streamers can make profit from cheering with Bits which are purchasable from Twitch directly.[] Affiliates are also able to access the Twitch Subscriptions feature, with all the same functionality that Partners have access to, with a maximum of five subscriber emotes.[] In September , the service announced that Affiliates would now receive a share of ad revenue.[]

Advertising on the site has been handled by a number of partners. In , Twitch had an exclusive deal with Future US.[] On April 17, , Twitch announced a deal to give CBS Interactive the rights to exclusively sell advertising, promotions and sponsorships for the community.[83][] On June 5, , Twitch announced the formation of the Twitch Media Group, a new in-house advertisement sales team which has taken over CBS Interactive's role of selling advertisements.[16]

For users who do not have ad-free access to a channel or Twitch Turbo, pre-roll advertising, and mid-roll commercial breaks that are manually triggered by the streamer, are displayed on streams. In September , Twitch announced that it would test automated mid-roll advertising on streams, which cannot be controlled by the streamer.[]

Platform support

Twitch CEO Emmett Shear has stated a desire to support a wide variety of platforms, stating that they wanted to be on "every platform where people watch video".[24] Twitch streaming apps are available for mobile devices and video game consoles, including Android and iOS,[] as well as PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, and Xbox video game consoles.[][][][]

Users can stream to Twitch from Windows, Mac, or Linux operating systems, either with stand-alone software like OBS, through a platform like EA's Origin software,[]Ubisoft's Uplay,[] or Valve's Steam.[] Games such as Eve Online,[]PlanetSide 2 and the Call of Duty franchise now link directly to Twitch as well.[3]:&#;40&#; In , Twitch released a software development kit to allow any developer to integrate Twitch streaming into their software.[]

Twitch Desktop App and CurseForge

The Twitch Desktop App replaced the Curse Client and Curse Launcher in It includes a dedicated browser for the Twitch website and additional functions inherited from the Curse software, such as mod installation and management for supported games via the CurseForge service, and voice chat.[] The software also serves as the client for the former Twitch Game Store.[]

In June , CurseForge was sold to Overwolf for an undisclosed sum. The current mod management in the Twitch client will be moved to a dedicated, though not standalone, CurseForge client.[][]

TwitchCon

Main article: TwitchCon

TwitchCon is a biannual fan convention devoted to Twitch and the culture of video game streaming.[] The inaugural event was held at the Moscone Center in San Francisco from September 25–26, Since its inception TwitchCon has been an annual event. The second TwitchCon was held in San Diego at the San Diego Convention Center from September 30 – October 2, [] The third annual TwitchCon was held in Long Beach at the Long Beach Convention and Entertainment Center from October 20–22, [] The fourth annual TwitchCon was held at the San Jose McEnery Convention Center in San Jose, California, from October 26–28, [] In , Twitchcon expanded overseas and hosted their first ever European event in Berlin in April ,[] alongside a North American event later in November in San Diego.[] TwitchCon had planned to host an event in Amsterdam in May , but this was cancelled due to the COVID pandemic.[] Another TwitchCon event was planned in San Diego in September ,[] but was also cancelled due to COVID[]

As a video-game teaching tool

Twitch is often used for video game tutorials; the nature of Twitch allows mass numbers of learners to interact with each human other and the instructor in real time.[] Twitch is also used for software development learning,[] with communities of users streaming programming projects and talking through their work.

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  60. ^Sarah Perez (March 28, ). "Twitch will sell video games on its site starting this spring". TechCrunch. Archived from the original on March 30, Retrieved March 29,
  61. ^Perez, Sarah. "Twitch acquired video indexing platform ClipMine to power new discovery features". TechCrunch. Archived from the original on September 14, Retrieved September 14,
  62. ^ abStatt, Nick (August 20, ). "Twitch Prime members will lose ad-free viewing next month". The Verge. Archived from the original on August 20, Retrieved August 20,
  63. ^"Twitch announces group streaming and a karaoke game for its 1M concurrent viewers". TechCrunch. Retrieved February 14,
  64. ^"Twitch Game Store is Shutting Down After November 27". GameRevolution. November 16, Archived from the original on February 15, Retrieved February 14,
  65. ^Kerr, Chris (September 18, ). "Twitch acquires IGDB to bolster search and discoverability capabilities". Gamasutra. Archived from the original on September 21, Retrieved September 18,
  66. ^Stephen, Bijan (September 26, ). "Eight years after its launch, Twitch is getting a slightly new look". The Verge. Archived from the original on September 26, Retrieved September 26,
  67. ^ abStephen, Bijan (December 10, ). "Twitch just locked down top streamers DrLupo, TimTheTatman, and Lirik". The Verge. Archived from the original on December 11, Retrieved December 11,
  68. ^ abShanley, Patrick (March 12, ). "Streamer Dr Disrespect Signs Multiyear Deal to Stay on Twitch". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 13, Retrieved March 13,
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  70. ^ ab
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twitch_(service)
How To Fix TWITCH STREAM DELAY (Streamlabs \u0026 Obs Studio) (2021 Updated)

Insights & Analytics

Introduction

Twitch Insights provides game and extension developers with analytics data to help developers make data-driven decisions about future development. As a developer, you can use this data to enhance the experience of broadcasters and viewers and optimize how they engage with your games and extensions on Twitch

Once a data field is added to a report, it will not be deleted in future versions of the report. New data fields may be added in new versions of the report, anywhere in the sequence of fields (that is, not necessarily at the end of the CSV).

Counting Device IDs

As explained below, some unique data fields (for example, Unique Viewers) are collected based on device IDs. At a given moment, a device ID is assigned to a single hardware device. For example, if someone loads an extension or watches a game on 2 devices, that involves 2 device IDs and counts as 2 Unique Viewers.

Web browsers store device IDs using cookies. The half-life of a cookie seems to be about 14 days, even if you ask the browser to store the cookie forever. So, on any given day, we can assume that a browser always provides the same device ID for a given device. But over a month, most browsers provide at least 2 device IDs for the same device, one ID initially and another after clearing and refreshing the cookie.

This applies primarily to the web platform. Mobile apps and console platforms have different storage regimes, and device IDs are much more durable in those environments.

How does this affect Insights data collection? On a particular day, this has very little impact, as we can expect 1 device to have only 1 device ID. Over time, though, 1 device will have multiple device IDs. As a result, there is a significant impact on Insights data fields that count device IDs over long periods of time (30 days or more). For these fields, the number of uniques is likely to be much higher than the number you get by extrapolating from shorter time periods. The major impact is on the Last 30 Days data fields, especially if your game or extension is used primarily from web browsers. For example, for Extensions that run only in browsers, the number of Unique Viewers Last 30 Days will be much higher than the number of Unique Viewers times

Drops Analytics (Beta)

Drops Analytics provides reporting on Drops Campaign performance, including full details on individual Drop reach and the top streamers engaging with your campaigns. Drops Analytics is available to all users of the current Drops product (i.e., there are no analytics provided for Legacy Drops). 

To access Drops Analytics for a campaign that has been live for at least 48 hours:

  1. Navigate to the Drops Campaign page.
  2. Click the Analytics button to see the analytics associated with the corresponding campaign. 
    screen shot of Drops campaign page

There are two reports available for download::

  • - a report detailing the performance of your campaign each day it has been live on Twitch, populated 48 hours after the campaign has run for at least one full day.
  • - a report detailing the performance of individual drops each day it has been live on Twitch, populated 48 hours after the campaign has run for at least one full day.

Data starts being collected after the campaign is active, subject to a one-day delay. For example, we start calculating the data for January 12th on January 14th at UTC Typically the calculations complete within 4 hours. The report is uploaded as soon as the calculations are done.

Terminology

TermDefinition
CampaignA time bound event where viewers will be eligible to earn Drops based on meeting various conditions while watching a Drops enabled stream. 
DropA group of rewards released when a viewer meets the conditions for the Drop
GameThe category that streamers must select in order to participate in the Drops Campaign 
RewardAn item awarded to viewers as part of a Drop.
ChannelA Twitch channel that participated in the Drops Campaign, because they streamed the game during the campaign period.

Data Fields

Note that all counts are for the corresponding day in the CSV file.

If there is no data for a day, either that day is missing from the report or it is in the report with all data fields having a value of 0 (i.e., no activity).

Campaign Overview Report

Column NameDescription
Record DateUTC Date for the data in each row. For example, data in the row for covers the period from TZ to TZ.
Campaign IDID of Drops Campaign.
Campaign NameName of Campaign.
Game IDID of the campaign’s game. Note that it is possible to change the game after the campaign’s gone live.
Game NameName of the game.
Streamers EligibleNumber of unique channels/streamers who streamed the game and had Drops enabled.
Viewers EligibleNumber of unique viewers who were present in channels that were streaming during the campaign and saw the campaign notification.
Event-Based Drops EarnedNumber of unique eligible viewers that earned an event-based Drop on the given date.
Time-Based Drops EarnedNumber of unique eligible viewers that earned a time-based Drop  on the given date.
Viewers ClaimedNumber of unique viewers that claimed a Drop on a given date.
Viewers Linked and ClaimedNumber of unique viewers that claimed a Drop, who also have their account linked to the game at the time of claim on the given date.
Streamers Eligible (Cumulative)Number of unique channels/streamers who streamed the game and had Drops enabled since the beginning of the campaign to the record date.
Viewers Eligible (Cumulative)Number of unique viewers who were present in channels that were streaming and saw the campaign notification from the beginning of the campaign to the record date.
Event-Based Drops Earned (Cumulative) Number of unique eligible viewers that earned an event-based Drop from the beginning of the campaign to the record date.
Time-Based Drops Earned (Cumulative)Number of unique eligible viewers that earned a time-based Drop  from the beginning of the campaign to the record date.
Viewers Claimed (Cumulative)Number of unique viewers that claimed a Drop from the beginning of the campaign to the record date.
Viewers Linked and Claimed (Cumulative)Number of unique viewers that claimed a Drop who also have their account linked to the game at the time of claim from the beginning of the campaign to the record date.

Campaign Overview - Drops Report

Column NameDescription
Record DateUTC Date for the data in each row. For example, data in the row for covers the period from TZ to TZ.
Campaign IDID of Drops Campaign.
Campaign NameName of Campaign.
Drop IDID of the Drop.
Drop NameName of Drop.
Game IDID of the campaign’s game. Note that it is possible to change the game after the campaign’s gone live.
Game NameName of the game.
Streamers EligibleNumber of unique channels/streamers who streamed the game and had drops enabled.
Event-Based Drops EarnedNumber of unique eligible viewers that earned an event-based Drop on the given date.
Time-Based Drops EarnedNumber of unique eligible viewers that earned a time-based Drop on the given date.
Viewers ClaimedNumber of unique viewers that claimed the Drop on the given date.
Viewers Linked and ClaimedNumber of unique viewers that claimed the Drop, who also have their account linked to the game at the time of claim on the given date.

Extension Developer Analytics

To download this data:

    1. On your Twitch developer console, go to the Extensions tab.
    2. On the line for the extension for which you want data, click Download CSV.

Data is provided as one CSV file per released extension. The file contains one row of data per day, from January 31, until the current day. Fields related to minimization are provided only as of June 22, (as noted in the following table). The file contains all data fields in the latest version of Extension analytics.

Data starts being collected after the Extension is installed and viewed, subject to a one-day delay. For example, we start calculating the data for January 12 on January 14 at UTC Typically the calculations complete within 1 hour. The report is uploaded as soon as the calculations are done.

Also see the Get Extension Analytics endpoint in the Twitch API. The endpoint returns a URL that you can use to download the CSV files. The endpoint can be used to return any report type of Extension analytics data.  

Data Fields (Overview Reports)

All counts are for the corresponding day in the CSV file. If there is no data for a day, either that day is missing from the report or it is in the report with all data fields having a value of 0 (that is, no activity).

Except where noted, all metrics count events from desktop browsers, mobile browsers, and the Twitch app.

Column NameDescription
DateUTC date for the data in each row. For example, data in the row for (August 1, ) covers the period from TZ to TZ.
Extension  NameName of the extension. Since the name can change and may take a few days to update internally, the Extension Client ID (which does not change) is preferable as an identifier.
Extension Client IDAlphanumeric identifier for the extension.
Extension Details Page VisitsNumber of visitor page loads of the extension’s Details page (https://www.twitch.tv/ext/<extension_id-version>. Reloading the page counts as multiple visits.
Unique Extension Details Page VisitsNumber of unique visitor page loads of the extension’s Details page. Specifically this measures unique device IDs (see Counting Device IDs).
InstallsNumber of install events of the extension.
UninstallsNumber of uninstall events of the extension.
ActivationsNumber of activation events of the extension.
Unique Active ChannelsNumber of unique broadcaster channel IDs that had at least one render while the extension is active. This can be interpreted as the number of unique broadcasters that used your extension on their channel and received at least one viewer. If a broadcaster streams with your extension but the extension has no viewers, that is not captured here.

Unique Active Channels Last 7 Days

Number of Unique Active Channels in the past 7 days. For example, if this metric is provided on July 31, it would cover July
Unique Active Channels Last 30 DaysNumber of Unique Active Channels in the past 30 days. For example, if this metric is provided on July 31, it would cover July
Unique Identity LinksNumber of unique user IDs that granted the extension access to their Twitch user IDs. Users can grant and revoke access multiple times. On any given day, only the first grant is counted.
Unique Identity UnlinksNumber of unique users who revoked access to their Twitch user IDs. Users can grant and revoke access multiple times; on any given day, only the first revoke is counted. 
RendersNumber of user page loads, watching channels with the extension. A page refresh counts as a render.
Unique RenderersNumber of unique users with a “renders” event. Specifically, this measures unique device IDs (see Counting Device IDs).
Unique Renderers Last 7 DaysNumber of Unique Renderers in the past 7 days. For example, if this metric is provided on July 31, it would cover July
Unique Renderers Last 30 DaysNumber of Unique Renderers in the past 30 days. For example, if this metric is provided on July 31, it would cover July Note this may be unexpectedly high; see Counting Device IDs.
ViewsNumber of times that 75% or more of the extension iframe was visible in any viewer’s browser. For panel extensions, this may be less than the number of renders, if the extension is rendered but the viewer does not scroll down to view it. Scrolling up and down multiple times does not count as multiple views.
Unique Viewers

Number of different viewers who watched this extension on Twitch, based on the Views definition above. Specifically, this measures unique device IDs (see Counting Device IDs).

If your extension is shown by a given device ID in multiple ways (panel, video overlay, video component), that counts as 2 Unique Viewers (1 for the panel and 1 for the video overlay and/or component).

Unique Viewers Last 7 DaysNumber of Unique Viewers in the past 7 days. For example, if this metric is provided on July 31, it would cover July
Unique Viewers Last 30 DaysNumber of Unique Viewers in the past 30 days. For example, if this metric is provided on July 31, it would cover July Note this may be unexpectedly high; see Counting Device IDs.
MouseentersNumber of times a mouse pointer enters (hovers over) the extension. This counts only desktop browser events.
Unique MouseentersNumber of unique Mouseenter events. Specifically, this measures unique device IDs (see Counting Device IDs). This counts only desktop browser events.
Unique Mouseenters Last 7 DaysNumber of Unique Mouseenters in the past 7 days. For example, if this metric is provided on July 31, it would cover July
Unique Mouseenters Last 30 DaysNumber of Unique Mouseenters in the past 30 days. For example, if this metric is provided on July 31, it would cover July
Mouseenters Per ViewerAverage number of Mouseenter events per viewer. Defined as Mouseenters / Unique Viewers
Mouseenter RateIndicates the ratio of Unique Viewers who also have mouseenter events. Defined as Unique Mouseenters / Unique Viewers. 
Clicks*Number of click events in the extension iframe.
Unique Interactors*Number of unique click events in the extension iframe. Specifically, this measures unique device IDs (see Counting Device IDs).
Unique Interactors* Last 7 DaysNumber of Unique Interactors in the past 7 days. For example, if this metric is provided on July 31, it would cover July
Unique Interactors* Last 30 DaysNumber of Unique Interactors in the past 30 days. For example, if this metric is provided on July 31, it would cover July Note this may be unexpectedly high; see Counting Device IDs.
Clicks Per Interactor*Average number of click events per interactor. Defined as: Clicks / Unique Interactors.
Interaction Rate*Indicates the ratio of interactors to viewers. Defined as: Unique Interactors / Unique Viewers.
MinimizationsNumber of times a viewer minimizes (hides) the extension. This field is provided from June 22, on.
Unique MinimizersNumber of times a viewer minimizes (hides) the extension. This field is provided from June 22, on.
Minimization RateIndicates how often viewers minimize the extension. Defined as Unique Minimizers / Unique Viewers. This field is provided from June 22, on.
UnminimizationsNumber of times a viewer unhides the extension after it was minimized. Unminimizations can happen for extensions that were minimized in previous days. This field is provided from June 22, on.
Unique UnminimizersNumber of Unique Viewers that unhide the extension after it was minimized. This field is provided from June 22, on. 
Unminimization RateIndicates how often viewers unhide the extension after it was minimized. Defined as Unique Unminimizers / Unique Viewers. This field is provided from June 22, on.

Bits Revenue USD

(Bits-enabled Extensions only) Revenue share earned by the developer from Bits transactions (in US dollars): this is Bits * 20% share * $/bit conversion rate. For more information about Bits in Extensions, see the Extensions Monetization Guide.
Bits Used(Bits-enabled Extensions only) Number of Bits used.
Bits Transactions(Bits-enabled Extensions only) Number of Bits transactions.
Bits Per Transaction(Bits-enabled Extensions only) Average number of Bits per transaction. Defined as Bits Used / Bits Transactions.
Unique Bits Users(Bits-enabled Extensions only) Number of unique users who used Bits in the extension. This is measured by user IDs, not device IDs.
Unique Bits Users Last 7 Days(Bits-enabled Extensions only) Number of unique users who used Bits in the extension in the last 7 days. For example, if this metric is provided on July 31, it would cover July This is measured by user IDs, not device IDs.
Unique Bits Users Last 30 Days(Bits-enabled Extensions only) Number of unique users who used Bits in the extension in the last 30 days. For example, if this metric is provided on July 31, it would cover July This is measured by user IDs, not device IDs.
Bits Used Per User(Bits-enabled Extensions only) Average number of Bits per user. Defined as Bits Used / Unique Bits Users.

NOTE: Click events will include false positives, as viewers often click into the player to reveal the Extension or other player controls. This is especially true for Overlay Extensions. You are allowed to implement Google Analytics to further instrument your Extension.

Partial Sample File

For brevity, in this sample file we show data for only 10 days.

Game Developer Analytics

Game Developer Analytics provides a full spectrum of your game’s performance on Twitch, including aggregate hours watched and number of concurrent streamers. It is available only to users who have registered an organization and claimed their game via the Twitch Developer Console. See Organization Management for more information.

To download this data:

  1. On your Twitch developer console, navigate to your organization console using the top navigation drop down. Then, click on the Games tab.
  2. Under the game for which you want data, click Export Daily CSV.

    If the button does not appear, the game does not meet the minutes-watched threshold for report generation. A report is available only if the game was broadcast for at least minutes (5 hours) over the time period covered by the report.

Data is provided as one CSV file per game. The file contains one row of data per day, for the past days. The file contains all data fields in the latest version of game analytics.

Data starts being collected after the game is broadcast and viewed, subject to a one-day delay. For example, we start calculating the data for January 12 on January 14 at UTC Typically the calculations complete within 4 hours. The report is uploaded as soon as the calculations are done.

Also see the Get Game Analytics endpoint in the Twitch API. The endpoint returns a URL that you can use to download the CSV files.

Terminology

TermDefinition
LiveLive broadcast or premiere.
Not-LiveRerun or VOD.
RerunSubsequent (not live) streaming of any past broadcast.
VODVideo on Demand. VODs are asynchronous pieces of content that viewers can watch whenever they like. A VOD may be a past broadcast, a highlight of a past broadcast, an uploaded video, or a clip (short, non-live streams created by viewers).

Clips are not included in the developer analytics data described in this document. Clips data is available via the clips-discovery API.
VodcastAn old term, which at Twitch comprises what are now known as premieres and reruns.

Data Fields (Overview Reports)

Note that all counts are for the corresponding day in the CSV file.

If there is no data for a day, either that day is missing from the report or it is in the report with all data fields having a value of 0 (i.e., no activity).

Column NameDescription
DateUTC date for the data in each row. For example, data in the row for (August 1, ) covers the period from TZ to TZ.
GameName of the game.
Game IDID of the game.
Total ViewsSum of Live Views + Not-Live Views.
Live ViewsNumber of times any stream of this game was viewed on Twitch, live. This includes live streams and Premieres. If someone watches a game 5 separate times in a day, that counts as 5 views here.
Not-Live ViewsNumber of times any stream of this game was viewed on Twitch, not live. This includes Reruns and VODs.
Total Unique ViewersNumber of different viewers who watched this game on Twitch live or not-live. Specifically this measures unique device IDs (see Counting Device IDs).
Live Unique ViewersNumber of Unique Viewers who watched this game live on Twitch. Specifically this measures unique device IDs (see Counting Device IDs).
Not-Live Unique ViewersNumber of Unique Viewers who watched this game not-live on Twitch. As above, this measures unique device IDs (see Counting Device IDs).
Average Concurrent ViewersAverage number of concurrent CCUs of this game, across Twitch.
Peak Concurrent ViewersPeak number of concurrent viewers of this game, across Twitch.
Peak Time - Concurrent ViewersUTC timestamp that corresponds to Peak Concurrent Viewers.
Total Hours WatchedSum of Live Hours Watched + Not-Live Hours Watched.
Live Hours WatchedNumber of hours this game was watched live on Twitch.
Not-Live Hours WatchedNumber of hours this game was watched not-live on Twitch.
Unique BroadcastersNumber of unique broadcasters who live-streamed this game on Twitch. Specifically, this measures unique channel IDs.
Hours BroadcastNumber of hours of this game that were broadcast on Twitch live.
Average Concurrent BroadcastersAverage number of broadcasters simultaneously streaming this game.
Peak Concurrent BroadcastersPeak number of broadcasters simultaneously streaming this game.
Peak Time - Concurrent BroadcastersUTC timestamp that corresponds to Peak Concurrent Broadcasters.
Live Unique Chat ParticipantsNumber of live unique chat participants for this game, across Twitch.
Total Live Chat Messages SentNumber of chat messages for this game, across Twitch.
Unique Active Channels with ExtensionsNumber of unique broadcaster channel IDs streaming your game, which had at least one render while an extension was active. This can be interpreted as the number of unique broadcasters that used an extension on their channel and received at least one render while streaming your game. If a broadcaster streams with an extension but the extension does not render for any viewers, that is not captured here.
Unique Active ExtensionsNumber of unique extensions related to Unique Active Channels with Extensions. Note that while the report is game-specific, some of the extensions may not be specific to the game.
Clips CreatedNumber of Clips created from this game.
Clip ViewsNumber of times any Clips of this game were watched.
Top Clip URLURL of the most-watched clip of this game.
Top Clip URL EmbedURL of the most-watched clip of this game, which you can embed in your site or blog. This is the same clip as for Top Clip URL, but the URL here contains additional parameters relevant to embedding clips (see Non-Interactive Frames for Clips). (Note: This URL contains a parameter. Ignore this; it is used only internally by Twitch.)

Sample File (Partial)

For brevity, in this sample file we show data for only 10 days.

Sours: https://dev.twitch.tv/docs/insights

Delay 2018 stream twitch

Twitch’s success in esports and the data delay issue

Twitch is booming together with esports. How do they handle such a massive audience?

To understand esports, you first need to know what Twitch is. Launched in , Twitch is a streaming platform where gamers share their screens, play their favorite games, and engage with their audience. Growing steadily during the first years, it reached 1 million monthly concurrent viewers in During , the numbers have skyrocketed: there were million concurrent viewers in November.

Given its success, Twitch is not used only by esports gamers anymore. For example, tournament organizers are also streaming their games on a platform that is by far the leader in the market for gaming in Western countries. The main competitors are YouTube Gaming and Facebook Gaming, both of which are more popular in Asia.

A new way of entertainment

For those of us who do not belong to Generation Z or are late Millennials, It is hard to believe the passion that is generated by watching other people play video games. For younger generations, it is already part of their culture. They’ve grown up playing games and those who are the best in the world are idols the same way Maradona or Pelé was for the football fans. Moreover, these new idols are much more engaging for them: streamers talk about their personal life, create videos to share with their audience, and constantly interact with their fans on the streaming or their social media channels.

Attracting not only gamers

Five out of the top ten streamers with the most followers worldwide are not professional gamers. The platform also provides a space for those internet personalities that want to add a new source of revenue: Twitch users pay 5€/month to have the chance to chat with their favorite streamers. The numbers are already mind-blowing: the highest-paid streamer in was Felix Lengyel, better known as ‘’xQc” with million USD.

Streamers like Ibai (3rd highest paid in ) took the streaming content one step further: his Twitch stream was the channel chosen by NBA star Marc Gasol to communicate he will be playing for the Los Angeles Lakers. It is also common for him to invite football stars such as Agüero, Courtois, or Neymar to his stream to play the popular game ‘’Among Us’’ together.

Ibai and Agüero on Twitch

Famous football or basketball players, YouTubers, popular journalists, and many other influencers are joining Twitch, and with them their massive audience. Twitch is growing the way it attracts people to its platform from very different angles. This will help esports popularity to continue increasing at a high rate: according to TwitchTracker, ~85% of the content generated is related to games, with popular esports titles Fortnite and League of Legends leading at the top. This means, more and more people outside of esports are entering a platform where esports is the main content: a perfect advertisement for an already booming industry.

Conflict of interests with tournament organizers

Another popular content that Twitch streamers like within the platform is casting, which means connecting their channel to a professional game and commentating it. This option has become controversial since there is a conflict of interest with the tournament organizers that want their audience to watch their games on their platform.

The organizers’ point of view is easy to understand: they invest in creating a tournament and they want to get the most possible audience to watch their event from the official source, which is related to the revenue they get from advertisers. This is why many popular tournaments ask streamers to integrate the organizers’ ads and to use a delay on their streams if they want to cover the tournament. This meant streamers couldn’t interact with their fans live, part of their works’ essence. Other tournaments like Valorant First Strike are directly forbidding the streaming of the content.

Delayed but still live-streaming, the best solution (for now)?

Esports is a social event: the audience likes to interact, to see people they like casting the games, and to express their opinion. That’s why Valve, the publisher behind CS:GO and Dota 2, offered streamers to choose a min delay option while connecting to the official tournament channel that would allow them to stream the games live. This can bring issues such as trolls spoiling the results from the official source. But while the industry is still figuring out this problem, this is a stage in that evolution.

ESL One Germany requirements for community streamers

It is important to mention that not only streamers have delays on their Twitch channels when streaming an esports event. Even the official channels from the tournaments that are streamed on Twitch do. This makes a lot of sense: without a delay, the players could know exactly where their rivals are positioned within the game. In most cases, there is a minutes delay, which doesn’t seem like a big deal, but it is: for the betting industry.

For bookmakers, working with delayed data resulting in delayed odds is a big issue, since they do not know what is happening in the game in real-time. The consequences are harming the esports betting experience: bookmakers risk to open their books for sure bets or, more likely, they tend to suspend the markets very often, not allowing the customer to engage with the live betting.

Oddin’s approach to esports data and delayed streamings

Esports live-betting is all about the right technology, expertise, and real-time data. Anything else leads to potential losses or a low-engaging solution for your bettors, who would head somewhere else. This is why Oddin partners with official esports data providers such as Bayes, which allows us to build our odds feed with the fastest data available. It is still common to see that solution providers gather their data from delayed streams, which means they can not offer a proper engaging betting experience. They need to suspend markets as soon as they notice something is happening. Or they scrape the others, in which case they do not control the quality and improvement of the solution.

While we are still learning how the new generations behave, one thing is clear: they are very demanding and they want to have freedom of choice. This is why a high uptime as the one Oddin provides (above 80%) is one of the keys for successfully onboard the younger generations to your sportsbook.

Sours: https://oddin.gg/blog/twitchs-success-in-esports-and-the-data-delay-issue/
How To FIX Your Laggy Stream! - Fix Dropped Frames, Best Encoder, And Bitrate Settings!

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