Amd epyc vs ryzen

Amd epyc vs ryzen DEFAULT

AMD Epyc 7742 vs AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X

AMD Epyc 7742

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X

vs

39 facts in comparison

AMD Epyc 7742

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X

Why is AMD Epyc 7742 better than AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X?

  • 95.33GB/s more memory bandwidth?
    190.7GB/svs95.37GB/s
  • 55W lower TDP?
    225Wvs280W
  • 4 more memory channels?
    8vs4
  • 3488GB larger maximum memory size?
    4000GBvs512GB
  • 96KB bigger L1 cache?
    4096KBvs4000KB

Why is AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X better than AMD Epyc 7742?

  • 7nm smaller semiconductor size?
    7nmvs14nm
  • 28.89% faster CPU speed?
    64 x 2.9GHzvs64 x 2.25GHz
  • 0.9GHz higher turbo clock speed?
    4.3GHzvs3.4GHz
  • 35700million more transistors?
    39500 millionvs3800 million
  • 7.2seconds faster Blender (classroom) result?
    88.6secondsvs95.8seconds
  • 3.9seconds faster Blender (bmw27) result?
    30secondsvs33.9seconds
  • 19.95% higher Cinebench R20 (multi) result?
    24763vs20644
  • 24.37% higher Cinebench R20 (single) result?
    495vs398

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General info

Small semiconductors provide better performance and reduced power consumption. Chipsets with a higher number of transistors, semiconductor components of electronic devices, offer more computational power. A small form factor allows more transistors to fit on a chip, therefore increasing its performance.

Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe) is a high-speed interface standard for connecting components, such as graphics cards and SSDs, to a motherboard. Newer versions can support more bandwidth and deliver better performance.

With integrated graphics you don’t need to buy a separate graphics card.

The thermal design power (TDP) is the maximum amount of power the cooling system needs to dissipate. A lower TDP typically means that it consumes less power.

A 32-bit operating system can only support up to 4GB of RAM. 64-bit allows more than 4GB, giving increased performance. It also allows you to run 64-bit apps.

A higher transistor count generally indicates a newer, more powerful processor.

Performance

More threads result in faster performance and better multitasking.

A larger L3 cache results in faster CPU and system-wide performance.

The CPU speed indicates how many processing cycles per second can be executed by a CPU, considering all of its cores (processing units). It is calculated by adding the clock rates of each core or, in the case of multi-core processors employing different microarchitectures, of each group of cores.

More data can be stored in the L2 cache for access by each core of the CPU.

A larger L2 cache results in faster CPU and system-wide performance.

A larger L1 cache results in faster CPU and system-wide performance.

When the CPU is running below its limitations, it can boost to a higher clock speed in order to give increased performance.

More data can be stored in the L3 cache for access by each core of the CPU.

Some processors come with an unlocked multiplier which makes them easy to overclock, allowing you to gain increased performance in games and other apps.

Memory

Error-correcting code memory can detect and correct data corruption. It is used when is it essential to avoid corruption, such as scientific computing or when running a server.

DDR (Double Data Rate) memory is the most common type of RAM. Newer versions of DDR memory support higher maximum speeds and are more energy-efficient.

More memory channels increases the speed of data transfer between the memory and the CPU.

It can support faster memory, which will give quicker system performance.

Features

Multithreading technology (such as Intel's Hyperthreading or AMD's Simultaneous Multithreading) provides increased performance by splitting each of the processor's physical cores into virtual cores, also known as threads. This way, each core can run two instruction streams at once.

NX bit helps protect the computer from malicious attacks.

3.Has FMA4

✖AMD Epyc 7742

✖AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X

FMA4 is used to speed up tasks such as adjusting the contrast of an image or adjusting volume.

4.Has FMA3

✔AMD Epyc 7742

✔AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X

FMA3 is used to speed up tasks such as adjusting the contrast of an image or adjusting volume.

5.Has F16C

✔AMD Epyc 7742

✔AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X

F16C is used to speed up tasks such as adjusting the contrast of an image or adjusting volume.

6.Has AES

✔AMD Epyc 7742

✔AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X

AES is used to speed up encryption and decryption.

7.Has AVX

✔AMD Epyc 7742

✔AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X

AVX is used to help speed up calculations in multimedia, scientific and financial apps, as well as improving Linux RAID software performance.

SSE is used to speed up multimedia tasks such as editing an image or adjusting audio volume. Each new version contains new instructions and improvements.

9.Has MMX

✔AMD Epyc 7742

✔AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X

MMX is used to speed up tasks such as adjusting the contrast of an image or adjusting volume.

Benchmarks

The Blender (classroom) benchmark measures the performance of a processor by rendering a 3D scene. More powerful processors can render the scene in less time.

The Blender (bmw27) benchmark measures the performance of a processor by rendering a 3D scene. More powerful processors can render the scene in less time.

This means the CPU is more efficient, giving a greater amount of performance for each watt of power used.

Geekbench 5 is a cross-platform benchmark that measures a processor's multi-core performance. (Source: Primate Labs, 2021)

Geekbench 5 is a cross-platform benchmark that measures a processor's single-core performance. (Source: Primate Labs, 2021)

This benchmark measures the performance of the CPU using multiple threads.

Which are the best Enterprise CPUs?

AMD Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3995WX

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3960X

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X

Show all
This page is currently only available in English.
Sours: https://versus.com/en/amd-epyc-7742-vs-amd-ryzen-threadripper-3990x

AMD Epyc 7501 vs AMD Ryzen 5 2600

32 facts in comparison

AMD Epyc 7501

AMD Ryzen 5 2600

Why is AMD Epyc 7501 better than AMD Ryzen 5 2600?

  • 52 more CPU threads?
    64vs12
  • 263.29GB/s more memory bandwidth?
    307GB/svs43.71GB/s
  • 48MB bigger L3 cache?
    64MBvs16MB
  • 3.14x faster CPU speed?
    32 x 2GHzvs6 x 3.4GHz
  • 13MB bigger L2 cache?
    16MBvs3MB
  • 2496KB bigger L1 cache?
    3072KBvs576KB
  • 6 more memory channels?
    8vs2
  • 1936GB larger maximum memory size?
    2000GBvs64GB

Why is AMD Ryzen 5 2600 better than AMD Epyc 7501?

  • 2nm smaller semiconductor size?
    12nmvs14nm
  • 90W lower TDP?
    65Wvs155W
  • 267MHz higher ram speed?
    2933MHzvs2666MHz
  • 0.9GHz higher turbo clock speed?
    3.9GHzvs3GHz
  • 30.32% higher PassMark result (single)?
    2261vs1735
  • 0.67MB/core more L3 cache per core?
    2.67MB/corevs2MB/core
  • Uses multithreading?
  • Has an unlocked multiplier?

General info

Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe) is a high-speed interface standard for connecting components, such as graphics cards and SSDs, to a motherboard. Newer versions can support more bandwidth and deliver better performance.

Small semiconductors provide better performance and reduced power consumption. Chipsets with a higher number of transistors, semiconductor components of electronic devices, offer more computational power. A small form factor allows more transistors to fit on a chip, therefore increasing its performance.

With integrated graphics you don’t need to buy a separate graphics card.

The thermal design power (TDP) is the maximum amount of power the cooling system needs to dissipate. A lower TDP typically means that it consumes less power.

A 32-bit operating system can only support up to 4GB of RAM. 64-bit allows more than 4GB, giving increased performance. It also allows you to run 64-bit apps.

A higher transistor count generally indicates a newer, more powerful processor.

Performance

More threads result in faster performance and better multitasking.

A larger L3 cache results in faster CPU and system-wide performance.

The CPU speed indicates how many processing cycles per second can be executed by a CPU, considering all of its cores (processing units). It is calculated by adding the clock rates of each core or, in the case of multi-core processors employing different microarchitectures, of each group of cores.

More data can be stored in the L2 cache for access by each core of the CPU.

A larger L2 cache results in faster CPU and system-wide performance.

A larger L1 cache results in faster CPU and system-wide performance.

When the CPU is running below its limitations, it can boost to a higher clock speed in order to give increased performance.

More data can be stored in the L3 cache for access by each core of the CPU.

Some processors come with an unlocked multiplier which makes them easy to overclock, allowing you to gain increased performance in games and other apps.

Memory

Error-correcting code memory can detect and correct data corruption. It is used when is it essential to avoid corruption, such as scientific computing or when running a server.

DDR (Double Data Rate) memory is the most common type of RAM. Newer versions of DDR memory support higher maximum speeds and are more energy-efficient.

It can support faster memory, which will give quicker system performance.

More memory channels increases the speed of data transfer between the memory and the CPU.

Features

NX bit helps protect the computer from malicious attacks.

FMA3 is used to speed up tasks such as adjusting the contrast of an image or adjusting volume.

F16C is used to speed up tasks such as adjusting the contrast of an image or adjusting volume.

AVX is used to help speed up calculations in multimedia, scientific and financial apps, as well as improving Linux RAID software performance.

AES is used to speed up encryption and decryption.

SSE is used to speed up multimedia tasks such as editing an image or adjusting audio volume. Each new version contains new instructions and improvements.

MMX is used to speed up tasks such as adjusting the contrast of an image or adjusting volume.

FMA4 is used to speed up tasks such as adjusting the contrast of an image or adjusting volume.

Multithreading technology (such as Intel's Hyperthreading or AMD's Simultaneous Multithreading) provides increased performance by splitting each of the processor's physical cores into virtual cores, also known as threads. This way, each core can run two instruction streams at once.

Benchmarks

Which are the best Enterprise CPUs?

AMD Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3995WX

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3960X

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X

Show all
This page is currently only available in English.
Sours: https://versus.com/en/amd-epyc-7501-vs-amd-ryzen-5-2600
  1. Swan canvas art
  2. Colonial mantel clock
  3. Emacs load path

AMD Ryzen Threadripper vs EPYC: What should professionals use?

The resurgence of AMD is nothing short of remarkable. Only a few years ago, its Opteron range was relegated primarily to the bargain bin, but now AMD processors are now rapidly taking over market share in both consumer PCs and data centers.

On the high end, AMD offers two heavily threaded performance kings – Ryzen Threadripper (and a Pro version) and EPYC. But which is the best choice for your next workstation and will be most optimized for your specific workflow? 

Ryzen Threadripper benefits

Primarily positioned as a workstation platform, Ryzen Threadripper is a single socket solution currently in its 3rd generation. With up to 64 total processing cores (and 128 threads), Threadripper is best suited for high demand applications like professional VFX, video, and rendering. Some of the key benefits over EPYC include:

Core Frequency – Unlike many other high core count processor options, Threadripper runs a Boost speed of 4.3-4.5GHz. This gives it the advantage in both heavily threaded applications like Media & Entertainment, but also single threaded applications like CAD and architecture. In contrast, EPYC has a Boost/Turbo around 3.2GHz, which is a significant drop in single threaded performance. 

Official Windows Support – Since EPYC is primarily a datacenter platform, you’ll typically find compatible motherboards without official Windows 10 support (and soon Windows 11). That’s not to say you can’t run the Windows desktop version on an EPYC workstation – we’ve been doing it for years on our HD360A – but rather it takes some additional expertise and driver installation. Threadripper, on the other hand, is a desktop platform with full Windows driver support, so it will not require any additional engineering to run as expected.

Availability – We’ve all felt the crunch with component shortages this year. Though no processors are what I would consider “readily available,” there’s a big difference between Threadripper and EPYC in terms of availability. You may pay a premium for a Threadripper CPU workstation right now, but lead time is usually 3-4 weeks, which pales in comparison to EPYC’s 20+ week lead time (yes, nearly half a year!) due to the current extreme supply limitations.

AMD EPYC benefits

EPYC is primarily pitched as a server/datacenter platform, but because of its high core count, scalability, and overall higher I/O bandwidth, we’re seeing many users running applications like Machine Learning and scientific simulations turn to the platform. Here are some of those key benefits for that professional user:

RAM Density/Channels – Most single socket EPYC motherboards will support up to 2TB of RAM in 8 channels, vs. 256GB in 4 channels with Threadripper. Though the extreme majority of users will never need 256GB+, for those that do, that’s a huge benefit.

ECC Support – Though the Threadripper architecture does support ECC, the TRX40 chipset does not, so until a refresh is available, EPYC (and Threadripper PRO) are the only AMD options for ECC support.

Scalability/Core Count – While Threadripper supports only a single socket, Most EPYC systems support dual CPU configurations, doubling the number of potential cores to 128 and threads to 256. This level of scalability is critical for the most CPU intensive applications or simulations like CFD.

Security – AMD’s Infinity Guard suite of security features provide an extra level of encryption for confidential data that Threadripper simply does not.

Efficiency/Performance per Watt – Most EPYC processors run 200-225W default TDP vs 280W (or higher) for Threadripper. This makes the thermals much easier to manage with EPYC and the main reason why liquid cooling is strongly recommended for Threadripper.

What about WRX80 Threadripper PRO?

AMD’s Threadripper PRO with WRX80 chipset is the newest product family in this space, and in many ways combines the best of TRX40 Threadripper and EPYC, filling a big gap between the two. From a performance standpoint, Threadripper PRO aligns closely with standard Threadripper with similar core counts and frequencies but also adds the ECC support, additional RAM capacity, and security features that EPYC offers.

Which Should Professionals Use?

AMD has mainly positioned EPYC as a datacenter solution, and with good reason. The efficiency and scalability of the platform along with AMD’s Infinity Guard security features make it a better fit for servers than most workstation applications.

Threadripper, however, with its higher core frequency and official Windows 10 support, is primarily oriented toward traditional workstation users and applications. That’s not to say that some professional workstation users won’t see specific benefits with EPYC over Threadripper or even Threadripper Pro.

For users looking for high RAM density solutions of 256GB+ that are very highly threaded enough to benefit from more than 128 threads – applications like Design and Simulation, Machine Learning, Weather, Research/Academia, and Computational Fluid Dynamics – there may be enough performance benefit to outweigh the additional expense of EPYC. But for all other workstation users in the Media & Entertainment, Architecture, Engineering & Design, or similar verticals, Threadripper just has too many benefits to ignore.

Josh Covington is the Managing Director of Sales and Marketing for Velocity Micro, a custom PC builder specializing in both gaming and workstation systems. Over his 14 years at Velocity Micro, Josh has helped thousands of customers configure the perfect PC to maximize frame rates and productivity.

Sours: https://www.techradar.com/news/amd-ryzen-threadripper-vs-epyc-what-should-professionals-use
Ryzen vs Threadripper vs Epyc - What Is The Difference? [Simple Guide]

Threadripper vs Epyc graphic

Threadripper vs Epyc – what’s the difference? Though only a few years ago, AMD seemed to have been relegated to the bargain bin, they now have two excellent options for high demand workstation users, HEDTs, and HPCs. For these users, which is the best choice?

Ryzen threadripper boxRyzen Threadripper Pros

With up to 64 total processing cores, Threadripper is primarily positioned as a workstation platform, best suited for high demand applications like video, professional VFX, and rendering. Some of the benefits include:

  • Core Frequency – Unlike most high core count processors, Threadripper runs a single core Boost speed of 4.3-4.5GHz vs around 3.2 for Epyc. This gives it the advantage in both heavily threaded applications like Media & Entertainment, but also single threaded applications like CAD and architecture.
  • Official Windows Support – Since Epyc is primarily a datacenter platform, you’ll typically find compatible motherboards without official Windows 10 support. That’s not to say you can’t run Windows desktop version on an Epyc workstation – we’ve been doing it for years on our HD360A – but rather it takes some additional knowhow to properly install working drivers. Since Threadripper is a desktop platform with full Windows driver support, it will not require any additional knowledge.

AMD Epyc chipAMD Epyc Pros

Epyc is mainly known as a server platform, but because of its high core count, scalability, and overall higher I/O bandwidth, we’re seeing many users running applications like Machine Learning and scientific simulations turn to the platform. Here are some of those key benefits for that user:

  • RAM Density/Channels – Most single socket Epyc motherboards will support up to 2TB of RAM in 8 channels, vs. 256GB in 4 channels with Threadripper. Though the extreme majority of users will never need 256GB+, that’s a huge benefit for those that do.
  • ECC Support – The Threadripper architecture does support ECC memory, but TRX40 chipset does not, so until a chipset refresh is available, Epyc (and Threadripper PRO) are the only AMD options for full ECC support.
  • Scalability/Core Count –Threadripper supports only a single socket, but most Epycs support dual CPU configurations, doubling the number of potential cores to 128 and threads to 256 as well as increasing PCIe lanes and I/O capacity. This level of scalability is critical for the most CPU intensive applications or simulations.
  • Security – AMD’s industry leading Infinity Guard is a suite of security features that provide an extra level of encryption that Threadripper does not.

What about WRX80 Threadripper PRO

AMD’s Threadripper PRO with WRX80 chipset is the newest product in this category, which in some ways combines the best of TRX40 Threadripper and Epyc. From a performance standpoint, Threadripper PRO aligns closely with standard Threadripper with similar core counts and frequencies but also adds the ECC support, additional RAM capacity, and security features that Epyc offers.

Threadripper vs Epyc – Which Should Professionals Use?

The answer depends on the specific use case. Epyc’s efficiency and scalability along with AMD’s Infinity Guard security features make it a better fit for servers than most workstation applications. In most cases, Threadripper, with its higher core frequency and official Windows 10 support, is best for traditional workstation users and applications.

That’s not to say that some professional workstation users won’t see specific benefits with Epyc over Threadripper or even Threadripper Pro though. For users looking for high RAM density solutions of 256GB+ that are highly threaded enough to benefit from more than 128 threads – applications like Design and Simulation, Machine Learning, Weather, Research/Academia, and Computational Fluid Dynamics – there may be enough performance benefit to outweigh the additional expense of Epyc. But for all other workstation users in the Media & Entertainment, Architecture, Engineering & Design, or similar verticals, Threadripper just has too many benefits to ignore.

Configure our AMD Threadripper Workstation HD80A now!

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Josh has been with Velocity Micro since 2007 in various Marketing, PR, and Sales related roles. As the Director of Sales & Marketing, he is responsible for all Direct and Retail sales as well as Marketing activities. He enjoys Seinfeld reruns, the Atlanta Braves, and Beatles songs written by John, Paul, or George. Sorry, Ringo.

Sours: https://www.velocitymicro.com/blog/threadripper-vs-epyc/

Epyc vs ryzen amd

Ryzen CPUs are best suited for gaming PCs, while the much more expensive Threadripper and Epyc models are geared towards workstations and servers instead.

There are several important pieces of hardware to keep in mind when building a PC, one of which is the CPU — the brains of every computer.

When looking for the right CPU, there are a number of factors to consider: performance, specifications, pricing, among others.

Now, if you’re building a new gaming PC and are, like many people today, thinking about getting an AMD CPU for your new build, you’ll find that there are several CPU brands currently being offered by “Team Red.”

This includes their immensely popular Ryzen lineup, but also the pricier Threadripper and Epyc CPUs.

So, how do the CPUs from these three brands differ from one another, and which should you ultimately pick for gaming?

That’s exactly what we’ll discuss and answer in this article, so read on!

The Basics

Ryzen vs Threadripper vs Epyc The Basics

Before we get to the comparisons, let’s take a closer look at each of the three aforementioned brands.

First, there’s the Ryzen series. Originally released in 2017, AMD’s Ryzen lineup includes a number of different CPU models that are further divided according to their overall performance and pricing as follows:

  • Ryzen 3 – Low-end
  • Ryzen 5 – Mid-range
  • Ryzen 7 – High-end
  • Ryzen 9 – Enthusiast

That said, mainstream Ryzen CPUs cover everything from basic entry-level solutions to gaming CPUs and the more powerful workstation-oriented CPUs that pack way more computing power.

As we move higher up the price and performance ladder, we get to the Ryzen Threadripper, a brand that covers a number of performance-oriented solutions that offer more cores and threads than even the most powerful of the Ryzen 9 models, albeit at a significant premium price.

Moreover, the price and performance gaps aren’t the only things separating the Threadripper from the main Ryzen series, as it also uses a special sTRX4 socket rather than the AM4 standard used by the rest of the Ryzen series.

Finally, we get to Epyc, a brand of CPUs based on the same architecture as the Ryzen and Threadripper models. However, they are geared mainly towards servers and thus also boast high core counts, offer better multitasking performance, better stability, along with some other features that are important for servers that you can’t find in the more affordable CPUs. Also, much like the Threadripper, Epyc CPUs use their own unique socket, the SP3.

With that out of the way, let’s go over some of the notable specs and features that people most often look for in CPUs today.

Core/Thread Count

Ryzen vs Threadripper vs Epyc Core Thread Count

The core and thread counts are often the first thing that people take note of when shopping for CPUs in 2021, and the success of Ryzen processors is owed in no small part to their high core and thread counts that completely outclassed what Intel was offering these past several years.

So, how do Ryzen, Threadripper and Epyc CPUs compare in this department?

Let’s take a look at the Ryzen 3000 series. They offer anywhere from 4 cores and 8 threads in the cheapest Ryzen 3 models to an impressive 16 cores and 32 threads in what is currently the most powerful and most expensive desktop Ryzen 9 CPU, the Ryzen 9 3950X.

However, the Threadripper 3000 series leave even the aforementioned Ryzen 9 in the dust, starting at 24 cores and 48 threads while going as high as 64 cores and 128 threads.

Meanwhile, the second generation of Epyc CPUs currently starts as low as 8 cores and 16 threads in the more affordable models to a whopping 64 cores and 128 threads in the premium ones, thus matching the latest, most expensive Threadripper in terms of core and thread count.

Ryzen vs Threadripper vs Epyc Threadripper

That said,Threadripper and Epyc CPUs both offer higher core counts than the mainstream Ryzen models, something that is very important for workstations and servers that need to process large volumes of data as quickly as possible.

However, games these days hardly need the monstrous thread counts offered by Threadripper and Epyc CPUs, even though many of them are optimized to take advantage of multiple cores/threads. Moreover, games usually tend to benefit more from high clock speeds rather than high thread counts.

In essence, the CPU clock is the frequency at which a single CPU core operates. It is commonly expressed in GHz (gigahertz) and it indicates how much data the core can process each second.

Of course, it’s worth noting that clock speeds, like the rest of on-paper specifications, aren’t a great way of estimating actual performance, especially considering all of AMD’s latest Ryzen and Threadripper CPUs’ base clock speeds are mostly confined to the 3-4 GHz range, and there are no major differences when it comes to boost clocks either.

As for Epyc CPUs, they usually have seemingly low base clock speeds and they don’t really overclock as well as the more affordable AMD CPUs do by design, although stability is much more important for servers than raw processing power.

Cache Memory

Ryzen vs Threadripper vs Epyc Cache Memory

Next, we should mention cache memory. Relatively speaking, this is one of the entries on a CPU spec sheet that’s often overlooked by gamers as it doesn’t offer any noticeable benefits when it comes to in-game performance. But obviously, it’s still an indispensable part of every CPU.

So, what does cache memory do?

Basically, it is a small memory cache that stores important data and allows the CPU to access it quickly whenever it needs to do so. Therefore, cache memory helps with multitasking but, more importantly, it contributes a lot in terms of system stability.

Again, if we take a look at the latest CPU models, we can see that the mainstream Ryzen CPUs have anywhere from 16 MB to 64 MB of L3 cache memory. Meanwhile, the latest Threadrippers come with either 128 or 256 MB, while the second generation Epyc CPUs start at 32 MB and can go as high as 256 MB.

That said, much like with core counts, both the Threadripper and Epyc models greatly out-spec the mainstream Ryzen models and are fairly evenly matched in this department, but this is hardly something that will make or break a gaming CPU.

RAM Support

Ryzen vs Threadripper vs Epyc RAM Support

Speaking of memory, cache memory obviously isn’t the only type of memory that needs to be kept in mind when it comes to CPUs. Namely, the amount of RAM and the number of supported memory channels is determined not only by the motherboard but also by the CPU itself.

As far as memory channels are concerned, the mainstream Ryzen CPUs only support dual-channel configurations. Meanwhile, Threadripper models can support quad-channel configurations, and the Epyc CPUs support a total of eight memory channels.

Needless to say, this means that the Threadripper and Epyc CPUs can support significantly greater memory bandwidth, thus being able to transfer and process important data much faster. And as before, while quad-channel and octa-channel RAM configurations would be overkill for gaming PCs, they can provide workstations and servers with a lot of extra bandwidth that can greatly enhance their overall performance.

Prices

Ryzen vs Threadripper vs Epyc Prices

One of the key factors to keep in mind when shopping for any piece of hardware is, of course, the price. Some don’t want to spend too much on a CPU, while others don’t mind the extra expense as long as it provides good value for the money.

As far as the overall costs are concerned, the mainstream Ryzen CPUs are obviously the most affordable ones around, ranging from as little as $100 for the budget Ryzen 3 models to as high as $750 for the most expensive Ryzen 9 ones, although the most popular gaming-oriented Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 7 models are found in the $200-$400 price range.

The Threadripper CPUs are more expensive, as you might expect. The latest Threadripper 3000 models cover the $1400-$4000 price range, which is way more expensive than any of the mainstream Ryzen CPUs.

Granted, the first and second generations of Threadrippers were more affordable, relatively speaking, and they could be found in the $500-$1000 and the $650-$1800 price ranges, respectively. However, with the introduction of the Ryzen 9 models to the mainstream lineup, Threadrippers became a more premium performance-oriented solution that now offers even more power at significantly higher price points.

Finally, when it comes to Epyc, they cover a fairly wide price range, starting as low as $450 (about the price of some Ryzen 7 and Ryzen 9 models) but go all the way up to a whopping $6950, making them the most expensive CPUs that AMD is currently offering.

Which is Best For Gaming?

Ryzen vs Threadripper vs Epyc For Gaming

Now, if you’re new to PC building, you might be wondering which of these CPU brands would be best for gaming. Do the beefier, more expensive CPUs offer better performance in games?

The short answer is: no, they don’t.

As mentioned before, the Ryzen 5 and the Ryzen 7 models are usually the most popular picks for gaming PCs. They are more than powerful enough to run the latest mid-range and high-end GPUs without bottlenecking them.

As for Threadrippers and Epyc CPUs, they are quite simply overkill when it comes to gaming and there’s no need to spend quadruple digits on a CPU if all you intend on using the PC for is gaming.

Obviously, these CPUs are aimed at high-end workstations and servers that can take full advantage of the extra features they offer, like higher core/thread counts, better stability, more PCIe lanes for additional GPUs and SSDs, and greater RAM bandwidth, among some other things that your average gaming PC can’t really benefit from.

Conclusion

Ryzen vs Threadripper vs Epyc Conclusion

So, all in all, the mainstream Ryzen series is composed of CPUs aimed at the average consumer, and it includes everything from affordable entry-level solutions for budget gaming PCs to the remarkably powerful Ryzen 9 models that would be right at home in many workstations, too.

However, Ryzen Threadripper and Epyc CPUs are simply not good fits for gaming, for several major reasons:

  1. They pack way more power than what a gaming PC needs.
  2. Most of them are much more expensive than the mainstream Ryzen CPUs.
  3. They both use special sockets (sTRX4 and SP3, respectively).

If you’re shopping for a new gaming CPU at the moment, we suggest checking out our selection of what we feel are the best CPUs for gaming in 2021. You’ll certainly find something there that will fit your needs and budget.

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Samuel Stewart
Samuel Stewart

Samuel is GamingScan's editor-in-chief. He describes himself as a dedicated gamer and programmer. He enjoys helping others discover the joys of gaming. Samuel closely follows the latest trends in the gaming industry in order to keep the visitors in the flow.

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Sours: https://www.gamingscan.com/ryzen-vs-threadripper-vs-epyc/
3rd Gen AMD EPYC™ server processors

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X vs EPYC 7763

Advantages and disadvantages


Performance rating91.02100.00
Novelty7 February 202015 March 2021
Cost$3999$7890
Boost clock speed43003500
Base clock speed29002450

Technical City couldn't decide between

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X

and

AMD EPYC 7763
AMD EPYC 7763

The differences in performance seem too small.

Be aware that Ryzen Threadripper 3990X is a desktop processor while EPYC 7763 is a server/workstation one.


If you still have questions about the choice between Ryzen Threadripper 3990X and EPYC 7763 - ask them in the comments and we'll answer them.

Sours: https://technical.city/en/cpu/Ryzen-Threadripper-3990X-vs-EPYC-7763

You will also be interested:


AMD EPYC 7742 vs AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X


AMD EPYC 7742 on Amazon USA
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X on Amazon USA

Comparison of the technical characteristics between the processors, with the AMD EPYC 7742 on one side and the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X on the other side. The first is dedicated to the server sector, It has 64 cores, 128 threads, a maximum frequency of 3.4GHz. The second is used on the very high-end desktop computer segment, it has a total of 64 cores, 128 threads, its turbo frequency is set to 4.3 GHz. The following table also compares the lithography, the number of transistors (if indicated), the amount of cache memory, the maximum RAM memory capacity, the type of memory accepted, the release date, the maximum number of PCIe lanes, the values ​​obtained in Geekbench 4 and Cinebench R15.


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Specifications:


ProcessorAMD EPYC 7742AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X
Market (main)ServerVery high-end desktop computer
ISAx86-64 (64 bit)x86-64 (64 bit)
MicroarchitectureZen 2Zen 2
Core nameRomeCastle Peak
FamilyEPYC 7002Ryzen Threadripper 3000
Part number(s), S-Spec100-000000053,
100-100000053WOF
100-000000163,
100-100000163WOF
Release dateQ3 2019Q1 2020
Lithography7 nm7 nm FinFET
Transistors32,000,000,00039,500,000,000
Cores6464
Threads128128
Base frequency2.3 GHz2.9 GHz
Turbo frequency3.4 GHz4.3 GHz
Cache memory256 MB256 MB
Max memory capacity4 TB1 TB
Memory typesDDR4-3200DDR4-3200
Max # of memory channels84
Max memory bandwidth190.7 GB/s95.37 GB/s
Max PCIe lanes12864
TDP225 W280 W
Suggested PSU750W ATX Power Supply800W ATX Power Supply
GPU integrated graphicsNoneNone
SocketSP3, LGA-4094sTRX4
Compatible motherboardSocket SP3 Motherboard Socket sTRX4 Motherboard 
CPU-Z single thread407511
CPU-Z multi thread23,13832,321
PassMark single thread2,1632,553
PassMark CPU Mark69,77480,902
(Linux 64-bit)
Geekbench 4 single core
4,6626,201
(Linux 64-bit)
Geekbench 4 multi-core
76,317141,034
(Linux)
Geekbench 5 single core
1,0041,341
(Linux)
Geekbench 5 multi-core
40,93334,431
(SGEMM)
GFLOPS performance
1,360 GFLOPS3,732 GFLOPS
(Multi-core / watt performance)
Performance / watt ratio
339 pts / W504 pts / W
Amazon
eBay


Note: Commissions may be earned from the links above.


We can better compare what are the technical differences between the two processors.

Suggested PSU: We assume that we have An ATX computer case, a high end graphics card, 16GB RAM, a 512GB SSD, a 1TB HDD hard drive, a Blu-Ray drive. We will have to rely on a more powerful power supply if we want to have several graphics cards, several monitors, more memory, etc.

Price: For technical reasons, we cannot currently display a price less than 24 hours, or a real-time price. This is why we prefer for the moment not to show a price. You should refer to the respective online stores for the latest price, as well as availability.

We see that the two processors have an equivalent number of cores, the turbo frequency of AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X is bigger, that the PDT of AMD EPYC 7742 is lower. The AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X was started more recently.

Performances :


Performance comparison between the two processors, for this we consider the results generated on benchmark software such as Geekbench 4.




In single core, the difference is 26%. In multi-core, the difference in terms of gap is 40%.

Note: Commissions may be earned from the links above. These scores are only an
average of the performances got with these processors, you may get different results.


CPU-Z is a system information software that provides the name of the processor, its model number, the codename, the cache levels, the package, the process. It can also gives data about the mainboard, the memory. It makes real time measurement, with finally a benchmark for the single thread, as well as for the multi thread.




In single core, the difference is 18%. In multi-core, the difference in terms of gap is 16%.

Note: Commissions may be earned from the links above. These scores are only an
average of the performances got with these processors, you may get different results.


PassMark is a benchmarking software that performs several performance tests including prime numbers, integers, floating point, compression, physics, extended instructions, encoding, sorting. The higher the score is, the higher is the device capacity.



On Windows 64-bit:



In single core, the difference is 23%. In multi-core, the difference in terms of gap is 114%.

On Linux 64-bit:



In single core, the difference is 33%. In multi-core, the difference in terms of gap is 85%.

Note: Commissions may be earned from the links above. These scores are only an
average of the performances got with these processors, you may get different results.


Geekbench 4 is a complete benchmark platform with several types of tests, including data compression, images, AES encryption, SQL encoding, HTML, PDF file rendering, matrix computation, Fast Fourier Transform, 3D object simulation, photo editing, memory testing. This allows us to better visualize the respective power of these devices. For each result, we took an average of 250 values on the famous benchmark software.


On Windows:



In single core, the difference is 29%. In multi-core, the difference in terms of gap is 80%.

On Linux:



In single core, the difference is -25%. In multi-core, the differential gap is 19%.

Note: Commissions may be earned from the links above. These scores are only an
average of the performances got with these processors, you may get different results.


Geekbench 5 is a software for measuring the performance of a computer system, for fixed devices, mobile devices, servers. This platform makes it possible to better compare the power of the CPU, the computing power and to compare it with similar or totally different systems. Geekbench 5 includes new workloads that represent work tasks and applications that we can find in reality.


Equivalence:

AMD EPYC 7742 Intel equivalentAMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X Intel equivalent

See also:

Dual AMD EPYC 7742


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