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Sours: https://www.whatcar.com/volkswagen/golf/hatchback/used-review/n776

Volkswagen Golf (Mk8)

Can it really be that time again? Like your MoT test or the start of the football season, a new Golf always seems to come around sooner than you expect. Here we are then: the eighth of the line.

The Golf is the lingua franca of the hatch world, universally known and understood. Although it’s always bang up-to-date, each generation is an evolution, springing few surprises. That’s key to its success. No Golf buyer ever had to engage with a conversation that began, ‘You’ve bought a what?’

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Same old, same old then?

Something’s different here though. This generation Golf lies at a crossroads. At the same time as it hits the streets, VW launches the ID.3. The ID.3 is mass-market electric car that you can own for similar money (probably more to buy but less to run). A future-facing pod propelled by new energy – literally and metaphorically.

So in some ways the Golf faces backward, like the Cutty Sark, last of the great tea-clipper sailing ships. A highly perfected version of something the world might no longer need.

Surely the Golf isn't looking outdated?

A little backward, maybe. It’s even got a diesel engine, albeit a new one with a double urea cat to get rid of the NOx. The stuff that means people no longer trust diesels. Which was, lest we forget, VW’s doing in the first place.

But it also looks forward, with a glass cockpit running new highly connected systems for info, entertainment, control and hazard warning.

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Which bits are new?

The Mk8 uses the same MQB platform as the Mk7, so you’ll find no significant changes in dimensions or basic hardware. Instead most things in the suspension and powertrains are gently improved and finessed.

All panels are new. If only a bit. Recognise it by the new front graphic, a blade that slashes across the vestigal grille and into the shallow all-LED headlamps. On the side, a new crease runs through the door handles. Out back we find new-shape tail-lamps and, because it’s more tear-dropped, a more slit-like rear screen.

What's the verdict?

“New eighth-gen Golf remains the lingua-franca of the hatch world. A finely polished machine”

There wasn’t a whole bunch wrong with the Mk7 Golf. And actually, most of the time in the new one we longed for the clarity of the old car’s infotainment. While some of the new system’s functions are proper wow-factor stuff, the no-buttons pratfall dismays us.

But the rest of the car is, sure enough, finely polished. Better steering, better refinement, better safety, more modern lighting. All of them steps ahead from a car that already pretty much led the class. Get yourself a 150bhp TSi with the multi-link axle and you’re laughing.

Oh and by the way, for the next few years, VW doesn’t even see Golf sales falling away. Early orders suggest ID3 buyers will come from other places, while yesterday’s Golf buyers stick to today’s Golf. They won’t go far wrong.

Next: Driving

Sours: https://www.topgear.com/car-reviews/volkswagen/golf-mk8
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Sours: https://www.whatcar.com/volkswagen/golf/hatchback/review/n17371
The CAR WIZARD shares the top VOLKSWAGEN Cars TO Buy \u0026 NOT to Buy!

Generation Gap: Ranking each and every VW Golf GTI generation

The GTI badge has been been slapped on seven generations of Volkswagen's Golf, and while the model is, as a whole, the textbook definition "hot hatch," some examples are simply not as good as others

Author of the article:

Peter Bleakney

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If you were to look up “hot hatch” in the dictionary, you’d find — well, nothing. But if it were there, a picture of the Volkswagen Golf GTI would be front and centre on the page.

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Not long after the front-drive Volkswagen Golf was launched in 1974 as a replacement for the long-serving Beetle, a few enthusiastic VW engineers, on their own time, fitted an Audi 110-horsepower 1.6-litre under its hood. Thus, a legend was born.

The 1976 VW Golf GTI was light, agile, roomy, fast and, most importantly, an absolute hoot to drive. It also proved to be a giant-killer, surprising many an unsuspecting established sports car.

There have been, and continue to be, plenty of worthy challengers to the Volkswagen GTI. Yet through its 40-plus years in the trenches of a segment it created, inspired engineering and slavish allegiance to the original credo have kept Volkswagen’s benchmark pocket-rocket at the top of the heap.

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Ah, but in North America we had to wait — until 1983, actually. Listed chronologically are the seven generations of GTI that have graced our showrooms. I’ve rated them for importance and desirability, and have also thrown in a few personal notes, having been a serial GTI owner for quite some years.

1. 1983-1984 Rabbit GTI Mk 1

First spot goes to the original, the watershed Mk 1 GTI. Granted, we had to wait six years for the “official” North American version – the Rabbit GTI – and, yes, our Pennsylvania-built car paled somewhat in comparison to its European brethren. Yet with a 90-horsepower 1.8-litre engine, close-ratio five-speed, 14-inch alloys and sport-tuned suspension, it was ours .

And it was mine. Working as a studio bass player in Toronto at the time, I purchased a black unit after playing on a radio jingle for the then-new 1983 Rabbit GTI. Much inspiration came from reading a rave review in the Car and Driver magazine kicking around the studio.

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List price in Canada was just a few bucks under 10-grand. The car wasn’t particularly well-built, and fifth gear was so short the little four-pot spun a lofty 3,200 rpm at only 100 km/h (VW added a taller top gear for 1984). Still, this seminal tinderbox drew me into the GTI fold. After two years of youthful abuse, my Rabbit GTI’s clutch started slipping, so I traded it in on a fresh Mk 2 GTI.

2. 1985-1992 Golf GTI Mk 2 (1985-1992)

In the hierarchy of GTI importance, I’m placing the Mark 2 in second spot. Named Motor Trend ’s 1985 Car of the Year, the ’85 Golf GTI brought a new level of refinement to the proceedings. Initially launched with a 100-hp 1.8-litre four, the Mark 2 put all the classic GTI moves in a slightly larger, rounder and considerably slicker package. A very satisfying offering, but when were we going to get some real performance to match those GTIs tearing it up on the other side of the pond?

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Volkswagen answered with the 1987 16v GTI. Adding a 16-valve cylinder head boosted the 1.8L four’s output to 123 horsepower and 120 lb-ft at 4,250 rpm. It didn’t sell particularly well, largely because of its exorbitant pricing – around $22,000 in Canada – and the fact it didn’t really feel much faster than its eight-valve brother due to the multi-valver’s dearth of low-end torque. I was all set to buy a 16v — until I drove it. Uh, no.

Cue the North-America-only 1990 GTI 16v that upped the ante in no uncertain terms. It got cool mesh 15-inch BBS wheels, round Euro-style headlights, Recaro seats, a super buttoned-down suspension and, most importantly, a lusty 2.0L 16-valve engine that spit out 134 hp, 133 lb-ft of torque and a rorty soundtrack.

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Finally, a GTI that was fast . I purchased one immediately, with the optional crank sunroof. Built from only 1990 to 1992, the 2.0L 16v was a helluva swan song for the Mk 2 GTI. A raucous little nutter and rare as chicken lips. This is car I wish I still had.

3. 2007-2009 Golf GTI Mk 5

After decades off course, the fifth gen marked redemption time. Volkswagen gets serious and the GTI regains its mojo. I’m placing the Mk 5 in third spot for importance. All the parts come together in a dynamic whole — and those parts include a new stiffer structure with a first-for-GTI multi-link independent rear suspension, standard 17-inch alloys, six-speed manual and a lusty 200 horsepower 2.0L direct-injection turbo four-cylinder.

Super-cool plaid seats are standard, and optional is a six-speed DSG dual-clutch auto. All accompanied by a hilarious “Un-Pimp Ze Auto” ad campaign wherein a white-suited nutty German and his mini-skirted sidekick destroy overly customized hot hatches in the most spectacular ways.

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4. 2015-present Golf GTI Mk 7

It’s hard to rate this latest version of the GTI in fourth position, as this new platform, along with Volkswagen’s commitment to continuous refinement, has netted a car that is bloody close to perfect. The Mk 7 GTI does everything so well, it’s hard to imagine needing anything else. Fuel efficient? Check. Need to move your apartment? No problem. Comfortable and quiet cruiser? Oh yeah. Want to have the time of your life strafing your favourite back road? Well, this is arguably what the GTI lives for.

For 2019, we see horsepower from the 2.0L turbo jump to 228, along with the addition of standard limited-slip differential and stronger brakes. If you’re feeling nostalgic, VW has resurrected the Rabbit GTI ($33,995) moniker with a special edition trim package. That’s 26 years from when I bought my 90-hp Rabbit GTI. Hmmm — perhaps it’s time for an upgrade.

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5. 2000-2006 Golf GTI Mk 4

The Mk 4 is generally considered the most un-loved of GTIs. I’m not entirely sure why. I’m placing it in fifth because I bought a VW GTI GLS 1.8T new in 2001, I still own it, and I like it. So there.

The Mk 4 GTI was originally launched in North America burdened with the “two-point-slow” 2.0-litre 115-horspower tractor engine, but that was mercifully a very brief dip into the Marianas Trench of lame-osity. The GTI was soon rolling into showrooms with either a 150-horsepower 175-lb-ft 20-valve Audi-sourced 1.8L turbo-four; or the 2.8L VR6 making 174 horsepower and 181 lb-ft of torque. Both were fitted with a five-speed transmission — leather interior and 17-inch alloys optional.

Ferdinand Piech, the guy responsible for, oh, the Audi Ur Quattro, Porsche 917 and, most recently, the Bugatti Veyron, had his mitts all over the Mk 4 Golf. He demanded interior quality that had never been seen before in this segment, and royally kicked suppliers keisters to deliver what he wanted. These cabins still hold up, with their cool blue illuminated gauge cluster, elegant design and premium quality plastics.

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More On This Topic

  1. The next-gen 2020 Volkswagen Golf is going high-tech inside, low-key out

  2. Wolfsburg ‘homecoming’ a sea of Volkswagen GTI cars and fans

For spirited driving (and tune-ability) the 1.8T version was the one, whereas the luxurious and swift VR6 elevated the GTI to mini-grand-tourer status. The 1.8T jumped to 175 horsepower for 2002 and the VR6 rose to 200 horses. Still, neither of these GTIs drove with the expected flair associated with the badge.

Then along came the limited silver-only 337 GTI for 2002 that made those of us who had all ready bought a Mk 4 GTI 1.8T weep openly. Lowered tuned suspension, 18-inch wheels, special body bits, Recaro seats, aluminum interior trim, a six-speed manual and 180 horsepower will do that.

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Adding insult to injury, VW launched the 20 th Anniversary GTI in 2003, which was mechanically identical to the 337, just with different wheels and three available colours, Imola Yellow, Jazz Blue and Black. Price in Canada for the 20 th Anniversary GTI was a staggering $34,150 — nearly $8,000 over the regular 1.8T. A cool collector piece if you can find one that hasn’t been thrashed.

6. 2009-2013 Golf GTI Mk 6

Not so much a new car as a refresh of the Mk 5. All the same goodness – precise steering, brilliant ride-handling balance and hatchback utility – with slicker body panels and some interior revisions. Horsepower remains at 200.

7. 1993-1999 Golf GTI Mk 3

Sorry, Mk 3, I’m placing you at the bottom of the heap for desirability. You’re kinda ugly and your standard 115-hp 2.0L 8-valve engine (later to be known as the “two-point-slow”) was hardly an inspiration point. Coarse and reluctant to rev, it took the wind out of the legend’s sails. A GTI with the same engine as your basic four-door Golf? C’mon.

VW had a plan. It stuffed its lovely narrow-angle 2.8L VR6 engine into the engine bay, thus creating the GTI VR6. The GTI’s cache suddenly took a major leap, as did horsepower and torque — it was now 172 hp and 173 lb-ft at 4,200 rpm. The creamy smooth VR6 launched the GTI to 100 km/h in 7.8 seconds, but the down side was a nose-heavy, under-steering disposition. Throw the GTI VR6 into a bend, and it pushed like Doug Ford (okay, your Uncle Ernie) at an all-you-can-eat BBQ.

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Sours: https://driving.ca/features/feature-story/generation-gap-ranking-each-and-every-vw-golf-gti-generation

Vw best golf

Volkswagen officially killed off the base model Mk7 Golf in January — the iconic hatchback had been reduced to one trim and on life support due to exceedingly poor sales. And that's probably understating it. The e-Golf nearly outsold the base Golf in 2019. The Mk8 version will only be coming to the U.S. in GTI and Golf R form.

The decision makes sense for VW. The incoming Taos crossover may eclipse the base Golf's yearly sales total in a month. But VW putting the Golf out of its American misery still leaves a sour taste. Despite its age, the Mk7 Golf was still perhaps the best cheap car on sale in America, the perfect combination of driving fun, affordability, efficiency and practicality.

I got a chance to drive both outgoing Mk7 Golf models, the purists' 6-speed manual in late 2020 and the still not-so-terrible 8-speed automatic in 2021. And it's a car that I will miss, even if the instrument display got very naggy toward the end.

VW

The Golf Is Fun to Drive

The Golf is a driver’s car on a sub-$25,000 budget. It only has 147 horsepower. But it has a fluid-shifting manual transmission (or the decent eight-speed auto, if you’re into that sort of thing). It puts out 184 lb-ft of torque, which comes on strong enough to make it quick at low speeds. The Golf is not as laser-like as a GTI, but it handles precisely for a cheap car. As far as 1.4-liter four-pots go, it even gives you some decent engine growl.

While driving the manual, I rolled up to a car media event, parked it next to the line of puffed-up Mercs and Maseratis — and realized that I probably had the most fun getting there. I’d even venture to say the manual base Golf's growl reminded me of the 1984 GTI I drove more than the current GTI.

VW

The Golf Is Refined

The Golf is like the Honda Accord, in that Volkswagen started with a great car and has spent nearly years softening the edges and making gradual improvements.

It’s a more elevated driving experience than the price tag would suggest. No, the Golf doesn’t deliver auditory solitude, and you do feel the bumps. But it’s also a $24,000 compact car that can cruise comfortably at 90 mph without you realizing you’re going that fast.

VW

The Golf Is Practical and Efficient

The Golf offers up to 53.7 cubic feet of cargo space. That's not CR-V level, but it’s on par with popular crossovers like the Jeep Cherokee, Audi Q5 and Porsche Macan. It’s also reasonably fuel-efficient without any fancy hybrid tech (just annoying eco-friendly reminders on the dash). The EPA rates the Golf at 28 mpg city, 36 mpg highway and 31 mpg combined. And as any VW owner could tell you, it may beat that estimate significantly in real driving.

VW

The Golf Has Not Been Outmoded

Buyers are still looking for fun, affordable small cars. It’s why every automaker wants a Hyundai Kona/Kia Seltos/Mazda CX-30 in the lineup. Those cars are — in function if not in form — small hatchbacks trying to fill the Golf’s niche. And the Golf drives better than any of them, probably at a cheaper price point.

Why do they succeed where the Golf fails? It’s down to ride height, cladding, and, perhaps, all-wheel-drive.

VW

Speaking of which, do you know what car converts well to lifting and cladding? The VW Golf, whether it’s an officially sanctioned Steyer-Daimler Puch built concept or a home-built job with a 2000s VW Rabbit. Just saying.

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Sours: https://www.gearpatrol.com/cars/a34922727/2021-volkswagen-golf-review/
Volkswagen Golf 2020 ultimate review: the full truth about the 'new' MK8!

Which VW Golf For Me?

What’s The Best Golf For You?

One of the most desirable cars on sale today is the Volkswagen Golf. It exudes a classless, sophisticated image. There are not many motors that can claim to look like they belong in just about any location – but the Volkswagen Golf is one of them. There are however, many, many combinations that a Golf can come in, so we’re going to help decipher that a little with this handy guide.

Petrol or Diesel?

Depending on the number of miles you travel, you might not be going far enough to reap the benefits of a diesel engine. Furthermore, if you’re somebody who makes frequent short journeys, diesel could prove to be the wrong choice altogether. A happy compromise may come in the form of VW’s excellent 1.5-litre TSI EVO petrol engine, this returns an easy 40mpg+ and is cheaper to buy than a diesel engine. We say if you’re doing under 13,000-miles a year, this is the sensible choice for a Golf.

Trim Levels

There are currently 11 different trim levels available for the VW Golf, and do keep in mind there’s often the option of a DSG automatic gearbox to go with these cars, too.

VW Golf rear view in blue

Golf S

Probably the trim level that makes the least sense to buy due to its lack of residual value and equipment. A very basic model – but you still get Bluetooth and DAB.

Golf SE

Where the Golf really starts to get appealing, this is the true ‘entry-level’ for most buyers. Front and rear parking sensors and handy adaptive cruise control are included on this model, there’s also automatic lights and wipers.

SE Navigation

As above, but fitted with a satellite navigation system and automatic emergency braking to sweeten the deal.

VW Golf dashboard

GT

The best thing about the GT model is that the attractive 1.5-litre TSI EVO engine comes in at this level, which is one of the best engines for the car. Ambient lighting inside is a little luxurious touch.

R-Line

R-Line is the standard Golf putting on a short-skirt. It is a sporty styled version of a normal Golf with a couple of extras thrown in on top – stainless steel pedals and R-Line sporty seats for example.

VW Golf front view in blue

GTD

The first of the ‘GT’ cars – the GTD is the diesel version and it packs a powerful 184ps 2.0-litre diesel engine under the bonnet. This delivers impressive performance and economy figures. Just keep in mind that you can’t have both when it comes to driving.

GTI

The GTI is a historic performance model in the world of motoring, and the powerful 2.0-litre petrol engine makes sure the driver always has enough clout on tap for a truly exciting ride. A great name in motoring history, and a top car to drive.

GTE

The GTE is the newest of the ‘GT’ cars in the Golf line-up. It uses a petrol engine and electric motors to produce a powerful yet efficient car. VW claims it’ll do over 160mpg, but if you can do that we will give you a big shiny medal. This is best thought of as a powerful eco-car rather than a performance model like the GTI.

VW Golf clutch

GTE Advance

A rather needless addition to the Golf range which is just a GTE with extra toys thrown in on top.

Golf E

When you take away all forms of combustion engine you get the e-Golf – an all-electric Golf that only uses the power of the blue spiky stuff to get you from A to B.

Golf R

‘R’ is the Golf turned up to 11. Full-fat, no holds-barred, all-out performance.310ps on tap, and a nifty 4WD system to help you put it all down onto the tarmac. A serious car for serious drivers.

The verdict, from Carsnip’s Editorial Chief, Tim Barnes-Clay:

I had two Golfs. One was a D reg 1.6CL and the other was an F reg 8-valve Golf GTI. I loved them. And I want an R now. Forget electric and go ‘full fat’. That’s my opinion – but you don’t need to take notice of it!

Sours: https://www.carsnip.com/car-advice/which-golf-for-me/

You will also be interested:

Volkswagen Golf review

In this review
  • 1
    Verdict - currently readingThe Mk8 Golf offers cleaner engines, an updated interior and the latest on-board tech, but it can’t quite reach the top of the class.
  • 2
    Engines, performance and driveVolkswagen offers the Golf with new mild-hybrid tech, along with its usual blend of strong, refined petrol and diesel engines.
  • 3
    MPG, CO2 and running costsMild and plug-in hybrid petrol engines help boost efficiency, offering low emissions and improved range
  • 4
    Interior, design and technologyThere’s a subtle exterior design, but the cabin is crammed full of new tech and useful features.
  • 5
    Practicality, comfort and boot spaceIt’s a case of ‘as you were’ for the Mk8 Golf, with first-rate levels of comfort and just enough practicality
  • 6
    Reliability and safetyThe new Golf is as safe as ever, but Volkswagen will want improved customer satisfaction
Sours: https://www.autoexpress.co.uk/volkswagen/golf


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