Mad magazine value guide

Mad magazine value guide DEFAULT

Overstreet's Grading Definitions

: This is an exceptional example of a given Mad - the best ever seen. The slightest bindery defects and/or printing flaws may be seen only upon very close inspection. The overall look is "as if it has never been handled or released for purchase." Only the slightest bindery or printing defects are allowed, and these would be imperceptible on first viewing. No bindery tears. Cover is flat with no surface wear. Inks are bright with high reflectivity. Well centered and firmly secured to interior pages. Corners are cut square and sharp. No creases. No dates or stamped markings allowed. No soiling, staining or other discoloration. Spine is tight and flat. No spine roll or split allowed. Staples must be original, centered and clean with no rust. No staple tears or stress lines. Paper is white, supple and fresh. No hint of acidity in the odor of the newsprint. No interior autographs or owner signatures. Centerfold is firmly secure. No interior tears.

: Near perfect in every way. Only subtle bindery or printing defects are allowed. No bindery tears. Cover is flat with no surface wear. Inks are bright with high reflectivity. Generally well centered and firmly secured to interior pages. Corners are cut square and sharp. No creases. Small, inconspicuous, lightly penciled, stamped or inked arrival dates are acceptable as long as they are in an unobtrusive location. No soiling, staining or other discoloration. Spine is tight and flat. No spine roll or split allowed. Staples must be original, generally centered and clean with no rust. No staple tears or stress lines. Paper is white, supple and fresh. No hint of acidity in the odor of the newsprint. Centerfold is firmly secure. No interior tears.

: Nearly perfect in every way with only minor imperfections that keep it from the next higher grade. Only subtle bindery or printing defects are allowed. No bindery tears. Cover is flat with no surface wear. Inks are bright with high reflectivity. Generally well centered and firmly secured to interior pages. Corners are cut square and sharp. No creases. Small, inconspicuous, lightly penciled, stamped or inked arrival dates are acceptable as long as they are in an unobtrusive location. No soiling, staining or other discoloration. Spine is tight and flat. No spine roll or split allowed. Staples must be original, generally centered and clean with no rust. No staple tears or stress lines. Paper is off-white to white, supple and fresh. No hint of acidity in the odor of the newsprint. Centerfold is firmly secure. Only the slightest interior tears are allowed.

: Nearly perfect with a minor additional virtue or virtues that raise it from Near Mint. The overall look is "as if it was just purchased and read once or twice." Only subtle bindery or printing defects are allowed. No bindery tears are allowed. Cover is flat with no surface wear. Inks are bright with high reflectivity. Well centered and firmly secured to interior pages. One corner may be imperceptibly blunted, but still almost sharp and cut square. Almost imperceptible indentations are permissible, but no creases, bends, or color break. Small, inconspicuous, lightly penciled, stamped or inked arrival dates are acceptable as long as they are in an unobtrusive location. No soiling, staining or other discoloration. Spine is tight and flat. No spine roll or split allowed. Staples must be original, generally centered, with only the slightest discoloration. No staple tears, stress lines, or rust migration. Paper is off-white, supple and fresh. No hint of acidity in the odor of the newsprint. Centerfold is firmly secure. Only the slightest interior tears are allowed.

: Nearly perfect with only minor imperfections that keep it from the next higher grade. Minor feathering that does not distract from the overall beauty of an otherwise higher grade copy is acceptable for this grade. The overall look is "as if it was just purchased and read once or twice." Subtle bindery defects are allowed. Bindery tears must be less than 1/16". Cover is flat with no surface wear. Inks are bright with high reflectivity. Generally well centered and secured to interior pages. Corners are cut square and sharp with ever-so-slight blunting permitted. A 1/16" bend is permitted with no color break. No creases. Small, inconspicuous, lightly penciled, stamped or inked arrival dates are acceptable as long as they are in an unobtrusive location. No soiling, staining or other discoloration apart from slight foxing. Spine is tight and flat. No spine roll or split allowed. Staples are generally centered; may have slight discoloration. No staple tears are allowed; almost no stress lines. No rust migration. In rare cases, a Mad was not stapled at the bindery and therefore has a missing staple; this is not considered a defect. Any staple can be replaced on Mads up to Fine, but only vintage staples can be used on Mads from Very Fine to Near Mint. Mint Mads must have original staples. Paper is cream to off-white, supple and fresh. No hint of acidity in the odor of the newsprint. Centerfold is secure. Slight interior tears are allowed.

: Nearly perfect with only a minor additional defect or defects that keep it from Near Mint. A limited number of minor bindery defects are allowed. A light, barely noticeable water stain or minor foxing that does not distract from the beauty of the Mad is acceptable for this grade. Cover is flat with no surface wear. Inks are bright with only the slightest dimming of reflectivity. Generally well centered and secured to interior pages. Corners are cut square and sharp with ever-so-slight blunting permitted. A 1/16" to 1/8" bend is permitted with no color break. No creases. Small, inconspicuous, lightly penciled, stamped or inked arrival dates are acceptable as long as they are in an unobtrusive location. No soiling, staining or other discoloration apart from slight foxing. Spine is tight and flat. No spine roll or split allowed. Staples may show some discoloration. No staple tears are allowed; almost no stress lines. No rust migration. In rare cases, a Mad was not stapled at the bindery and therefore has a missing staple; this is not considered a defect. Any staple can be replaced on Mads up to Fine, but only vintage staples can be used on Mads from Very Fine to Near Mint. Mint Mads must have original staples. Paper is cream to off-white, supple and fresh. No hint of acidity in the odor of the newsprint. Centerfold is secure. Slight interior tears are allowed.

: Nearly perfect with outstanding eye appeal. A limited number of minor bindery defects are allowed. Almost flat cover with almost imperceptible wear. Inks are bright with slightly diminished reflectivity. An 1/8" bend is allowed if color is not broken. Corners are cut square and sharp with ever-so-slight blunting permitted, but no creases. Several lightly penciled, stamped or inked arrival dates are acceptable. No obvious soiling, staining or other discoloration, except for minor foxing. Spine is tight and flat. No spine roll or split allowed. Staples may show some discoloration. Only the slightest staple tears are allowed. A very minor accumulation of stress lines may be present if they are nearly imperceptible. No rust migration. In rare cases, a Mad was not stapled at the bindery and therefore has a missing staple; this is not considered a defect. Any staple can be replaced on Mads up to Fine, but only vintage staples can be used on Mads from Very Fine to Near Mint. Mint Mads must have original staples. Paper is cream to off-white and supple. No hint of acidity in the odor of the newsprint. Centerfold is secure. Very minor interior tears may be present.

: Fits the criteria for Very Fine but with an additional virtue or small accumulation of virtues that improves the Mad's appearance by a perceptible amount.

: An excellent copy with outstanding eye appeal. Sharp, bright and clean with supple pages. A Mad in this grade has the appearance of having been carefully handled. A limited accumulation of minor bindery defects is allowed. Cover is relatively flat with minimal surface wear beginning to show, possibly including some minute wear at corners. Inks are generally bright with moderate to high reflectivity. A 1/4" crease is acceptable if color is not broken. Stamped or inked arrival dates may be present. No obvious soiling, staining or other discoloration, except for minor foxing. Spine is almost flat with no roll. Possible minor color break allowed. Staples may show some discoloration. Very slight staple tears and a few almost very minor to minor stress lines may be present. No rust migration. In rare cases, a Mad was not stapled at the bindery and therefore has a missing staple; this is not considered a defect. Any staple can be replaced on Mads up to Fine, but only vintage staples can be used on Mads from Very Fine to Near Mint. Mint Mads must have original staples. Paper is tan to cream and supple. No hint of acidity in the odor of the newsprint. Centerfold is mostly secure. Minor interior tears at the margin may be present.

: Fits the criteria for Very Fine but with an additional defect or small accumulation of defects that detracts from the Mad's appearance by a perceptible amount.

: An above-average copy that shows minor wear but is still relatively flat and clean with outstanding eye appeal. A small accumulation of minor bindery defects is allowed. Minor cover wear beginning to show with interior yellowing or tanning allowed, possibly including minor creases. Corners may be blunted or abraded. Inks are generally bright with a moderate reduction in reflectivity. Stamped or inked arrival dates may be present. No obvious soiling, staining or other discoloration, except for minor foxing. The slightest spine roll may be present, as well as a possible moderate color break. Staples may show some discoloration. Slight staple tears and a slight accumulation of light stress lines may be present. Slight rust migration. In rare cases, a Mad was not stapled at the bindery and therefore has a missing staple; this is not considered a defect. Any staple can be replaced on Mads up to Fine, but only vintage staples can be used on Mads from Very Fine to Near Mint. Mint Mads must have original staples. Paper is tan to cream, but not brown. No hint of acidity in the odor of the newsprint. Centerfold is mostly secure. Minor interior tears at the margin may be present.

: Fits the criteria for Fine but with an additional virtue or small accumulation of virtues that improves the Mad's appearance by a perceptible amount.

: An above-average copy that shows minor wear but is still relatively flat and clean with no significant creasing or other serious defects. Eye appeal is somewhat reduced because of slight surface wear and the accumulation of small defects, especially on the spine and edges. A FINE condition Mad appears to have been read a few times and has been handled with moderate care. Some accumulation of minor bindery defects is allowed. Minor cover wear apparent, with minor to moderate creases. Inks show a major reduction in reflectivity. Blunted or abraded corners are more common, as is minor staining, soiling, discoloration, and/or foxing. Stamped or inked arrival dates may be present. A minor spine roll is allowed. There can be a 1/4" spine split or severe color break. Staples show minor discoloration. Minor staple tears and an accumulation of stress lines may be present, as well as minor rust migration. In rare cases, a Mad was not stapled at the bindery and therefore has a missing staple; this is not considered a defect. Any staple can be replaced on Mads up to Fine, but only vintage staples can be used on Mads from Very Fine to Near Mint. Mint Mads must have original staples. Paper is brown to tan and fairly supple with no signs of brittleness. No hint of acidity in the odor of the newsprint. Minor interior tears at the margin may be present. Centerfold may be loose but not detached.

: Fits the criteria for Fine but with an additional defect or small accumulation of defects that detracts from the Mad's appearance by a perceptible amount.

: An above-average but well-used Mad. A Mad in this grade shows some moderate wear, eye appeal is somewhat reduced because of the accumulation of defects. Still a desirable copy that has been handled with some care. An accumulation of bindery defects is allowed. Minor to moderate cover wear apparent, with minor to moderate creases and/or dimples. Inks have major to extreme reduction in reflectivity. Blunted or abraded corners are increasingly common, as is minor to moderate staining, discoloration, and/or foxing. Stamped or inked arrival dates may be present. A minor to moderate spine roll is allowed. A spine split of up to 1/2" may be present. Staples show minor discoloration. A slight accumulation of minor staple tears and an accumulation of minor stress lines may also be present, as well as minor rust migration. In rare cases, a Mad was not stapled at the bindery and therefore has a missing staple; this is not considered a defect. Any staple can be replaced on Mads up to Fine, but only vintage staples can be used on Mads from Very Fine to Near Mint. Mint Mads must have original staples. Paper is brown to tan with no signs of brittleness. May have the faintest trace of an acidity odor. Centerfold may be loose but not detached. Minor tears may also be present.

: Fits the criteria for Very Good but with an additional virtue or small accumulation of virtues that improves the Mad's appearance by a perceptible amount.

: The average used Mad. A Mad in this grade shows some significant moderate wear, but still has not accumulated enough total defects to reduce eye appeal to the point that it is not a desirable copy. Cover shows moderate to significant wear, and may be loose but not completely detached. Moderate to extreme reduction in reflectivity. Can have an accumulation of creases or dimples. Corners may be blunted or abraded. Store stamps, name stamps, arrival dates, initials, etc. have no effect on this grade. Some discoloration, fading, foxing, and even minor soiling is allowed. As much as a 1/4" triangle can be missing out of the corner or edge; a missing 1/8" square is also acceptable. Only minor unobtrusive tape and other amateur repair allowed on otherwise high grade copies. Moderate spine roll may be present and/or a one inch spine split. Staple discolored. Minor to moderate staple tears and stress lines may be present, as well as some rust migration. Paper is brown but not brittle. A minor acidic odor can be detectable. Minor to moderate tears may be present. Centerfold may be loose or detached at one staple.

: Fits the criteria for Very Good but with an additional defect or small accumulation of defects that detracts from the Mad's appearance by a perceptible amount.

: A used Mad showing some substantial wear. Cover shows significant wear, and may be loose or even detached at one staple. Cover reflectivity is very low. Can have a book-length crease and/or dimples. Corners may be blunted or even rounded. Discoloration, fading, foxing, and even minor to moderate soiling is allowed. A triangle from 1/4" to 1/2" can be missing out of the corner or edge; a missing 1/8" to 1/4" square is also acceptable. Tape and other amateur repair may be present. Moderate spine roll likely. May have a spine split of anywhere from 1" to 1-1/2". Staples may be rusted or replaced. Minor to moderate staple tears and moderate stress lines may be present, as well as some rust migration. Paper is brown but nor brittle. Centerfold may be loose or detached at one staple. Minor to moderate interior tears may be present.

: Fits the criteria for Good but with an additional virtue or small accumulation of virtues that improves the Mad's appearance by a perceptible amount.

: Shows substantial wear; often considered a "reading copy." Cover shows significant wear and may even be detached. Cover reflectivity is low and in some cases completely absent. Book-length creases and dimples may be present. Rounded corners are more common. Moderate soiling, staining, discoloration and foxing may be present. The largest piece allowed missing from the front or back cover is usually a 1/2" triangle or a 1/4" square. Tape and other forms of amateur repair are common. Spine roll is likely. May have up to a 2" spine split. Staples may be degraded, replaced or missing. Moderate staple tears and stress lines may be present, as well as rust migration. Paper is brown but not brittle. Centerfold may be loose or detached. Moderate interior tears may be present.

: Fits the criteria for Good but with an additional defect or small accumulation of defects that detracts from the Mad's appearance by a perceptible amount.

: A Mad showing substantial to heavy wear. A copy in this grade still has all pages and covers, although there may be pieces missing up to and including missing subscription offers that do not impact the story. Mads in this grade are commonly creased, scuffed, abraded, soiled, and possibly unattractive, but still generally readable. Cover shows considerable wear and may be detached. Nearly no reflectivity to no reflectivity remaining. Store stamp, name stamp, arrival date and initials are permitted. Book-length creases, tears and folds may be present. Rounded corners are increasingly common. Soiling, staining, discoloration and foxing is generally present. Up to 1/10 of the back cover may be missing. Tape and other forms of amateur repair are increasingly common. May have a spine split between 2" and 2/3 the length of the Mad. Staples may be degraded, replaced or missing. Staple tears and stress lines are common, as well as rust migration. Paper is brown and may show brittleness around the edged. Acidic odor may be present. Centerfold may be loose or detached. Interior tears are common.

: A copy in this grade shows heavy wear. Some collectors consider this the lowest collectible grade because Mads in lesser condition are usually incomplete and/or brittle. Mads in this grade are usually soiled, faded, ragged and possibly unattractive. This is the last grade in which a Mad remains generally readable. Cover may be detached, and inks have lost all reflectivity. Creases, tears and/or folds are prevalent. Corners are commonly rounded or absent. Soiling and staining is present. Mads in this condition generally have all pages and most of the covers, although there may be up to 1/4 of the front cover missing or no back cover, but not both. Tape and other forms of amateur repair are more common. Spine roll is more common; spine split can extend up to 2/3 the length of the Mad. Staples may be missing or show rust and discoloration. An accumulation of staple tears and stress lines may be present, as well as rust migration. Paper is brown and may show brittleness around the edges but not in the central portion of the pages. Acidic odor may be present. Accumulation of interior tears. Chunks may be missing. The centerfold may be missing if readability is generally preserved (although there may be difficulty). Subscription coupons may be cut.

: Most Mads in this grade have been sufficiently degraded to the point where there is little or no collector value; they are easily identified by a complete absence of eye appeal. Mads in this grade are brittle almost to the point of turning to dust with a touch, and are usually incomplete. Extreme cover fading may render the cover almost indiscernible. May have extremely severe stains, mildew or heavy cover abrasion to the point that some cover inks are indistinct/absent. Covers may be detached with large chunks missing. Can have ragged edges and extensive creasing. Corners are rounded or virtually absent. Covers may have been defaced with paints, varnishes, glues, oil, indelible markers or dyes, and may have suffered heavy water damage. Can also have extensive amateur repairs such as laminated covers. Extreme spine roll present; can have extremely ragged spines or a complete, book-length split. Staples can be missing or show extreme rust and discoloration. Extensive staple tears and stress lines may be present, as well as extreme rust migration. Paper exhibits moderate to severe brittleness (where the Mad literally falls apart when examined). Extreme acidic odor may be present. Extensive interior tears. Multiple pages, including the centerfold, may be missing that affect readability. Subscription coupons may be cut.

: Mads that are coverless, but are otherwise complete, or covers missing their interiors.

: Coverless Mads that have incomplete interiors, wraps or single pages will receive a grade of .1 as will just front covers or just back covers.


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MAD MAGAZINE

HOME  >  UK TITLES (M)  >  MAD MAGAZINE

Publishers: THORPE & PORTER / SURON ENTERPRISES / FLEETWAY

Dates: 1 Oct 1959-381 Jan 1994

Issues: CLICK HERE to view issues, super-size cover images and values in 9 grades

Total value for all issues of this title listed:

Condition

PR
1.0
FR
1.5
GD
2.0
VG
4.0
FN
6.0
VF
8.0
VF/NM
9.0
NM-
9.2
NM
9.4
MINT
10.0
Issues384384384384384384384384384
Total £103.00202.00301.00612.601,2002,3304,4205,6306,830

Note: some PR issues may have no value. Selected issues in FN, VF or VF/NM may not exist in some titles.

Sours: https://www.comicpriceguide.co.uk/uk_comic.php?tc=mad
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Publication Dates: October/November 1952 - Present

Publication Info:

MAD was first published in 1952 in a comic book format with a cover date of October/November 1952. Beginning with issue #24 (July 1955), MAD converted to a standard magazine size format. The MAD editorial and publishing staff celebrates September as their anniversary month, as the magazine first hit the newsstands in that month of 1952.

Originally priced at 10�, MAD increased the cover price to 25� when it changed formats and became a magazine (issue #24). Prices have risen accordingly ever since, even though the magazine still employs the plug CHEAP right under the price, on every issue.

William M. (Bill) Gaines was the founder and publisher of MAD. Harvey Kurtzman was the magazine/comic's first editor. Kurtzman left MAD after issue #28, July 1956 and was replaced by Albert B. (Al) Feldstein with issue #29, September 1956.

Bill Gaines took over E. C. (Entertainment Comics) Publications when his father, Max, died in a freak boating accident in 1947 and owned the magazine until 1982, when he sold it to Time-Warner. Max himself was a pioneer in the comic book industry, producing Famous Funnies and Carnival of Comics in 1933/34. He later became co-publisher of DC-National along with Harry Donenfeld, left, founded All American Comics, was bought out by DC, and founded EC.

Bill Gaines retained editorial control of the publication until his death in 1992.

The current location of the editorial offices is 1700 Broadway, New York NY. Other locations, starting at the first, included: 225 Lafayette Street, 850 Third Street and 485 Madison Avenue, all in New York city.

Mad magazine has, in its 50+ year existence, become a well-recognized worldwide brand. Over the years, Mad has been published in 25 countries or territories, but currently only is published in 10. The countries which at one time or another published and distributed MAD are Argentina, Denmark, France, Great Britain, Greece, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Puerto Rico, Spain, Taiwan and Turkey. The countries in which MAD is currently published are Australia, Brazil, Canada, Finland, Germany, Hungary, India, South Africa, Sweden and the United States of America.

MAD was a pioneering influence not only for its irreverent, sarcastic editorial posture but also for innovations in magazine publishing itself. One such innovation was the inclusion of records inserts to the magazine. The Special and Annual insert records include Meet The Staff From MAD (Worst From MAD #2 and Ridiculously Expensive MAD), Nose Job (Worst From MAD #5, from MAD Twists Rock &'N' Roll), She Let's Me Watch Her Mom & Pop Fight (Worst From MAD #6, from Fink Along With MAD), It's A Gas (Worst From MAD #9, from Fink Along With MAD), Gall In The Family (MAD Special #11), Makin' Out (MAD Special #26), It's A Super Spectacular Day (MAD Special #31), and A MAD Look At Graduation (MAD Special #32). The CD that wasincluded with MAD #350 contains three songs. The record which came with MAD Disco contains 6 songs. The Totally MAD CD collection contains all of the Special and Annual songs.

MAD began publishing paperback books with The MAD Reader in December 1954 and ended with Spy vs. Spy The Updated Files #8 by Bob Clarke and Duck Edwing in August 1993.

Between 1954 and 1993, 220 paperbacks books were released. Ninety-four contained previously published material. Bristling MAD (#93, June 1993) was the last reprint book. MAD has resumed producing paperback books again, starting with a reprint of How to Be a Successful Dog (December 1999).

There were also a number of MAD calendars produced in the US: 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1988, 1989, 1990,1993 and1997. For 1996, a 35th Anniversary Commemorative Calendar was produced and was also a stapled-in premium to the fanzine The MAD Panic #37.. Page a day calendars were released for 2001 and 2002. Mad also published an Eternal Calendar for promotional purposes. A poster featuring the classic Mingo Alfred E. Neuman was produced for 1988. This calendar was produced by Bi-Rite. German calendars were produced for 1977, 1978, and 2001. An Australian calendar was released for 1982; a Finnish calendar was released for 1991.

One of the lasting icons of MAD magazine and American pop culture is MAD's official mascot, Alfred E. Neuman. The origin of the image of Neuman is somewhat hazy, though some believe the earliest image is in an ad for Atmore's Mince Meat Plum Pudding, in the Illustrated London News (the New York City edition), circa1895. Other images or characters of Neuman include - though there is no definitive source of verification or any continuity of creative authorship - The Yellow Kid, The Hampden Handsome Waiter (Hampden Brewing Company) and Howdy Doody.

The best and most widely-accepted image of Alfred E. Neuman, from which all images of the goofy kid who says, What, Me Worry? are derived, is the Alfred E. Neuman for President drawing by Norman Mingo from issue #30.

PRICING & COLLECTING INFO:

    Consecutive run estimates (ranges from good to mint):
  • Issues 1-10: $1200 - $7500
  • 11-23: $950 - $3800
  • 24-100: $650 - $1750
  • 101-200: $500 - $1500
  • 201-300: $375 - $850
  • 301-428: $200 - $650
Key Issues:

Volume 1, #1: Initial publication
Issue #24: 1st magazine format issue.








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DC Collectibles MAD Series 1 Guide

Mad Magazine Values

Mad Magazine: Values of Back Issues

Founded by Harvey Kurtzman and William Gaines, the American comedy magazine known as Mad hit the shelves in 1952.

Originally a comic book, Mad developed readerships of over 2,000,000 in the 70s, known for the brilliant satirical pieces that filled each page.

The comic ran for 23 issues before being converted to magazine format, primarily to avoid the attention of the Comics Code Authority.

Public figures, politics, entertainment and pop culture are the usual targets for Mad’s satirical stabs.

Nowadays, the mascot, Alfred E. Neuman, is generally slapped on the cover to stand in for a new movie or event that the comic focuses on that issue.

In the beginning, the cover art was much different, as if growing and morphing to find itself.

Mad Magazine Key Issue: Mad Comic #1

MAD comic magazine issue 1. Click for values

MAD Comic #1

Record Sale: $24,000
Minimum Value: $200

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Mad Comic #1

Record sale: $24,000
Minimum value (in poor but complete condition): $180

"Tales Calculated to Drive You… MAD." Published in October of 1952, the first Mad comic portrayed a frightened family awaiting some sort of beast named Melvin. For only ten cents, children could read a series of stories meant to drive them insane.

In a 2010 interview, Al Jaffee, a lifelong Mad contributor, made the statement: "Mad was designed to corrupt the minds of children. And from what I'm gathering from the minds of people all over, we succeeded."

Articles in the first comic book consisted of "Hoohah!" with art by Jack Davis; "Blobs" by Wally Wood' "Ganefs" by Bill Elder' and "Varmint" by John Severin.

Mad Magazine Comic #2

Mad Magazine comic #2 by EC Comics. Click for values

MAD Comic #2

Record Sale: $4,000
Minimum Value: $40

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Mad Comic #3

MAD Comic #3 EC 1953. Click for values

MAD Comic #3

Record Sale: $2,800
Minimum Value: $30

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Click to read about the Beginner Comic Book Investment eBook

Why This Guide is AWESOME for Wannabe Comic Investors

If you have either tried (and failed) to make money flipping comic books, or are frustrated by the huge array of choice out there, then this is the eBook for you.

It's packed with 32 in-depth analyses of easy-to-buy and sell comic books from the Bronze to Modern ages.

These are titles we have personally made a lot of money buying and selling. So can you.

Make more than your money back with your first successful trade (or by NOT buying a losing book!).

If you are not completely satisfied, we have a 365-day money-back guarantee.

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Mad Magazine Comic #4-23

Click any image or link to check the value of each issue.

(Article continues below)

Detailed Comic Book Price Guides for EC Series

Click any link to see full details of issue-by-issue prices for the series!

Mad #14 value
Mad #23 click for values

Key Issue: The First Ever Mad Magazine #24

Mad Magazine issue #24, the first actual magazine format issue. Click for values

MAD Magazine #24

Record Sale: $2,000
Minimum Value: $20

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In the 24th issue of the comic, Mad decided to turn into a magazine. This was largely due to the attention the publisher had received from the Comics Code Authority (essentially censoring its other titles).

Launching a new era, publisher William Gaines and editor Harvey Kurtzman paraodied the TV show, "This is Your Life," wrestling, space travelers, and Bufferin.

Key Issue: Mad Magazine #30

Mad Magazine #30, first Alfred E. Neumann cover. Click for values

MAD Magazine #24

Record Sale: $2,650
Minimum Value: $20

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In many ways, Alfred E. Neumann IS Mad Magazine. His face is probably what you think of when you hear the name of this iconic publication.

This first appearance on the cover of Mad is a key issue. A recent sale broke the record, with a CGC 9.6 selling for $1,750 at ComicLink.

Get yours valued for free if you have one.

Have Your Mad Back Issues #1 Through #50 Valued

If you have any early Mad Magazines, we would love to help you sell, value, or find insurance for these national treasures.

Simply send in a few pictures and we can get started to find out exactly what they're worth. Contact us here to start the process today.

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