Sc congressional district 5 race

Sc congressional district 5 race DEFAULT

Congressional District 5, SC

In 2019, Congressional District 5, SC had a population of 738k people with a median age of 40.1 and a median household income of $56,282. Between 2018 and 2019 the population of Congressional District 5, SC grew from 731,341 to 738,205, a 0.939% increase and its median household income grew from $52,045 to $56,282, a 8.14% increase.

The 5 largest ethnic groups in Congressional District 5, SC are White (Non-Hispanic) (65.1%), Black or African American (Non-Hispanic) (26.1%), White (Hispanic) (3.07%), Two+ (Non-Hispanic) (2.03%), and Asian (Non-Hispanic) (1.7%). 0% of the households in Congressional District 5, SC speak a non-English language at home as their primary language.

97.4% of the residents in Congressional District 5, SC are U.S. citizens.

In 2019, the median property value in Congressional District 5, SC was $167,500, and the homeownership rate was 73.4%. Most people in Congressional District 5, SC drove alone to work, and the average commute time was 26.3 minutes. The average car ownership in Congressional District 5, SC was 2 cars per household.

Congressional District 5, SC borders Congressional District 9, NC, Congressional District 10, NC, Congressional District 12, NC, Congressional District 2, SC, Congressional District 3, SC, Congressional District 4, SC, Congressional District 6, SC, and Congressional District 7, SC.

Sours: https://datausa.io/profile/geo/congressional-district-5-sc

SC US House of Representatives Elections and Candidates: 2022

South CarolinaSC GovernmentSC Elections SC US House ElectionsSCIWAY will provide complete coverage of South Carolina's November 8, 2022 general elections.

Want to learn about South Carolina's US House of Representative candidates and elections? This is the spot! The list below includes up-to-date links for all US Congressional districts and races for South Carolina.

If you need info about other federal, state or local-level elections in South Carolina, please go to our main SC Election Guide.

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US House District 1 Candidates

US House District 1 includes large portions of Beaufort and Charleston counties plus smaller portions of Berkeley, Colleton, and Dorchester counties.

US House District 2 Candidates

US House District 2 includes all of Aiken, Barnwell, and Lexington counties plus portions of Orangeburg and Richland counties.

US House District 3 Candidates

US House District 3 includes Abbeville, Anderson, Edgefield, Greenwood, Laurens, McCormick, Oconee, Pickens and Saluda counties plus portions of Greenville and Newberry counties.

US House District 4 Candidates

US House District 4 includes most of Greenville and Spartanburg counties.

US House District 5 Candidates

US House District 5 includes all of Cherokee, Chester, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lancaster, Lee, Union and York counties, most of Sumter County and portions of Newberry, Richland and Spartanburg counties.

US House District 6 Candidates

US House District 6 includes all of Allendale, Bamberg, Calhoun, Clarendon, Hampton, Jasper and Williamsburg counties plus portion of Beaufort, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Dorchester, Florence, Orangeburg, Richland and Sumter counties.

US House District 7 Candidates

US House District 7 includes all of Chesterfield, Darlington, Dillon, Georgetown, Horry (Myrtle Beach), Marlboro and Marion counties plus most of Florence County.
Sours: https://www.sciway.net/sc-elections/south-carolina-us-representatives.html
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Election day is March 20, 2021. Runoffs will be held on April 24, 2021, if necessary.

MONROE, La. (KNOE) - On March 20, 2021, voters in parts of Louisiana will be tasked with electing a representative for Louisiana’s 5th Congressional District. The winner of this special election will represent Northeast Louisiana as well as some eastern and central parts of the state.

According to the Secretary of State’s website, there are 12 candidates vying for the seat:

CandidateParty
Sandra “Candy” ChristopheDemocrat
Chad ConerlyRepublican
“Jim” DavisNo Party
Allen GuilloryRepublican
Robert LansdenRepublican
Julia LetlowRepublican
Jaycee MagnusonRepublican
Horace MeltonRepublican
M.V. “Vinny” MendozaIndependent
Richard H. PannellRepublican
Sancha SmithRepublican
Errol Victor Sr.Republican

Democrat Jessica Honsinger originally filed to run, but she has since withdrawn. This leaves Sandra “Candy” Christophe the lone Democrat in the race.

Need information on registering to vote? Click here for information.

In Northeast Louisiana, voters in the following parishes can vote in the 5th Congressional District race: Caldwell, Catahoula, Concordia, East Carroll, Franklin, Jackson, La Salle, Lincoln, Madison, Morehouse, Ouachita, Richland, Tensas, West Carroll, and Winn.

Voters in all or parts of these parishes will also vote in this race: Avoyelles, East Feliciana, Grant, Rapides, St. Landry, Tangipahoa, Washington, and West Feliciana.

Louisiana’s 5th Congressional District has been held by Republicans since 1993, except for a period from Jan. 2003 to Aug. 2004. In 2002, conservative Democrat Rodney Alexander won a runoff election by about a thousand votes and took office the following January. The first-term Congressman switched to the Republican party just before the 2004 election and went on to be reelected five times.

If no one wins the election outright by getting more than 50% of the vote, the two candidates who received the most votes will head to a runoff election.

Need to check your voter registration? Click here for information.

Again, election day is March 20, 2021. Runoffs will be held on April 24, 2021, if necessary.

Copyright 2021 KNOE. All rights reserved.

Sours: https://www.knoe.com/2021/02/03/here-are-the-candidates-running-for-louisianas-5th-congressional-district/
Race for the 8th Congressional district

South Carolina's 5th congressional district

Member
(Residence)Party Years Cong
ress Electoral history District location Thomas Tudor Tucker (1745-1828).jpg
Thomas Tudor Tucker
(Charleston)Anti-AdministrationMarch 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1793 1st
2ndElected in 1788.
Re-elected in 1790.
Retired. 1789–1793
"Ninety-Six district"
South Carolina congressional districts

  1st district, "Charleston"

  2nd district, "Beaufort-Orangeburg"

  3rd district, "Georgetown-Cheraw"

  4th district, "Camden"

  5th district, "Ninety-Six"

Alexander Gillon
(Charleston)Anti-Administration March 4, 1793 –
October 6, 1794 3rdElected in 1793.
Died. 1793–1797
"Ninety-Six district"
(Map unknown) VacantOctober 6, 1794 –
February 9, 1795 Robert Goodloe Harper - Project Gutenberg etext 20873 (cropped).jpg
Robert Goodloe Harper
(Charleston)Pro-Administration February 9, 1795 –
March 3, 1795 3rd
4th
5th
6thElected October 13–14, 1794 to finish Gillon's term and elected the same day to the next term.
Re-elected in 1796.
Re-elected in 1798.
Retired. FederalistMarch 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1801 1797–1803
"Ninety-Six district"
1796 election results by district
William Butler
(Mount Willing)Democratic-RepublicanMarch 4, 1801 –
March 3, 1803 7thElected in 1800.
Redistricted to the 2nd district. Richard Winn
(Winnsboro)Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1813 8th
9th
10th
11th
12thRedistricted from the 4th district and re-elected in 1803.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Retired. 1803–1813
"Sumter district" David R. Evans
(Winnsboro)Democratic-Republican March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815 13thElected in 1812.
Retired. 1813–1823
"Newberry district" William Woodward
([data unknown/missing])Democratic-Republican March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817 14thElected in 1814.
Lost re-election. Starling Tucker
(Mountain Shoals)Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1823 15th
16th
17thElected in 1816.
Re-elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1820.
Redistricted to the 9th district. George-McDuffie.jpg
George McDuffie
(Charleston)Democratic-Republican (Jackson) March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825 18th
19th
20th
21st
22nd
23rdRedistricted from the 6th district and re-elected in 1823.
Re-elected in 1824.
Re-elected in 1826.
Re-elected in 1828.
Re-elected in 1830.
Re-elected in 1833.
Re-elected in 1834.
Resigned to become Governor of South Carolina. 1823–1833
"Edgefield district" Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1831 NullifierMarch 4, 1831 –
1834 1833–1843
[data unknown/missing]Vacant1834 –
December 8, 1834 23rdFrancis Wilkinson Pickens.jpg
Francis W. Pickens
(Edgefield)NullifierDecember 8, 1834 –
March 3, 1839 23rd
24th
25th
26th
27thElected to finish McDuffie's term.
Also elected to the next full term.
Re-elected in 1836.
Re-elected in 1838.
Re-elected in 1840.
Retired. DemocraticMarch 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843 Armistead Burt
(Abbeville)Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1853 28th
29th
30th
31st
32ndElected in 1843.
Re-elected in 1844.
Re-elected in 1846.
Re-elected in 1848.
Re-elected in 1850.
Retired. 1843–1853
[data unknown/missing]James Lawrence Orr - Brady-Handy.jpg
James L. Orr
(Anderson)Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1859 33rd
34th
35thRedistricted from the 2nd district and re-elected in 1853.
Re-elected in 1854.
Re-elected in 1856
Retired. 1853–1863
[data unknown/missing]JohnDAshmore.jpg
John D. Ashmore
(Greenville)Democratic March 4, 1859 –
December 21, 1860 36thElected in 1858.
Re-elected in 1860 but resigned due to Civil War. VacantDecember 21, 1860 –
March 3, 1863 36th
37thCivil WarDistrict eliminated March 4, 1863 District re-established March 4, 1875 Robert Smalls - Brady-Handy.jpg
Robert Smalls
(Beaufort)RepublicanMarch 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879 44th
45thElected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
Lost re-election. 1875–1883
[data unknown/missing]GeorgeDTillman.jpg
George D. Tillman
(Edgefield)Democratic March 4, 1879 –
July 19, 1882 46th
47thElected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Lost contested election. Robert Smalls - Brady-Handy.jpg
Robert Smalls
(Beaufort)Republican July 19, 1882 –
March 3, 1883 47thWon contested election.
Retired. John James Hemphill.jpg
John J. Hemphill
(Chester)Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1893 48th
49th
50th
51st
52ndElected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Lost renomination. 1883–1893
[data unknown/missing]Thomas Jefferson Strait.jpg
Thomas J. Strait
(Lancaster)Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1899 53rd
54th
55thElected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
Lost renomination. 1893–1903
[data unknown/missing]DavidEFinley.jpg
David E. Finley
(York)Democratic March 4, 1899 –
January 26, 1917 56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
64thElected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916 but died before next term began. 1903–1913
[data unknown/missing]1913–1923
[data unknown/missing]VacantJanuary 26, 1917 –
February 21, 1917 64thPaulGMcCorkle.jpg
Paul G. McCorkle
(York)Democratic February 21, 1917 –
March 3, 1917 Elected to finish Finley's term in the 64th Congress.
Retired. STEVENSON, WILLIAM F. HONORABLE LCCN2016859711.jpg
William F. Stevenson
(Cheraw)Democratic March 4, 1917 –
March 3, 1933 65th
66th
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
72ndElected to finish Finley's term in the 65th Congress.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Lost renomination. 1923–1933
[data unknown/missing]James Richards portrait, 1956.jpg
James P. Richards
(Lancaster)Democratic March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1957 73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84thElected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Retired. 1933–1943
[data unknown/missing]1943–1953
[data unknown/missing]1953–1963
[data unknown/missing]Robert Hemphill portrait.jpg
Robert W. Hemphill
(Chester)Democratic January 3, 1957 –
May 1, 1964 85th
86th
87th
88thElected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Resigned to become Judge of the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina. 1963–1973
[data unknown/missing]VacantMay 1, 1964 –
November 3, 1964 88thThomas S. Gettys.jpg
Thomas S. Gettys
(Rock Hill)Democratic November 3, 1964 –
December 31, 1974 88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rdElected to finish Hemphill's term.
Also elected to the next full term.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Retired and resigned before next term began. 1973–1983
[data unknown/missing]Kenneth Lamar Holland.jpg
Kenneth L. Holland
(Gaffney)Democratic January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1983 94th
95th
96th
97thElected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Retired. John Spratt, official portrait, 111th Congress.jpg
John Spratt
(York)Democratic January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 2011 98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111thElected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Lost re-election. 1983–1993
[data unknown/missing]1993–2003
[data unknown/missing]2003–2013
[data unknown/missing]Mick Mulvaney 113th Congress.jpg
Mick Mulvaney
(Lancaster)Republican January 3, 2011 –
February 16, 2017 112th
113th
114th
115thElected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Resigned to become Director of the Office of Management and Budget. 2013–Present
[data unknown/missing]VacantFebruary 16, 2017 –
June 20, 2017 115thRalph Norman official photo cropped.jpg
Ralph Norman
(Rock Hill)Republican June 20, 2017[3]
present 115th
116th
117thElected to finish Mulvaney's term.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Carolina%27s_5th_congressional_district

Congressional race 5 sc district

South Carolina’s 5th Congressional District

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Sours: https://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/SC/5
Pennsylvania-3 Congressional District Race Highlight

Vote share

Dem.506070

Rep.506070

No results

Circle size is proportional to the amount each county’s leading candidate is ahead.

CountyMarginEst. votes reportedTotal votesAbsentee
YorkNorman +21

100%

143,349 69,282
LancasterNorman +27

100%

49,654 27,718
SumterBrown +1.0

100%

40,095 26,307
KershawNorman +27

100%

33,419 18,269
CherokeeNorman +45

100%

25,146 10,523
ChesterNorman +12

100%

15,696 8,160
NewberryNorman +25

100%

15,083 7,622
UnionNorman +25

100%

13,154 5,568
FairfieldBrown +21

100%

12,085 6,764
SpartanburgNorman +61

100%

9,867 3,409
LeeBrown +27

100%

8,415 4,432
View allCollapse
CandidateAbsentee/early votesVotesPct.
Norman94,79250.4%
Brown93,26249.6%
Total reported188,054

100% of counties (11 of 11) have reported absentee votes. Data for absentee votes may not be available in some places.

See absentee ballots returned in each state

Maggie Astor

Maggie Astor Jan. 7, 2021

Vice President Mike Pence affirms Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Kamala Harris as the next president and vice president.

See all updates

Sours: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/11/03/us/elections/results-south-carolina-house-district-5.html

Now discussing:

South Carolina's 5th Congressional District
SC 5th District Map.PNG
Incumbent
Ralph NormanRepublican Party
Cook Partisan Voter Index (2018): R+9
U.S. Census Bureau (2010 data)[1]
Population: 662,829
Gender: 48.6% Male, 51.4% Female
Race[2]: 67.6% White, 27.9% Black, 1.1% Asian
Ethnicity: 4.1% Hispanic
Unemployment: 13.1%
Median household income
$41,942
High school graduation rate
82.1%
College graduation rate
21.2%

The 5th District is located in northern South Carolina along the border of North Carolina. The district includes all of Cherokee, Chester, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lancaster, Lee, Union, and York counties. Portions of Newberry, Spartanburg, and Sumter counties also lie within the district.[3]

The current representative of the 5th congressional district is Ralph Norman (R). Norman won election in the special election on June 20, 2017, to replace Mick Mulvaney after his confirmation as director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget earlier in the year.

2016 Pivot Counties

See also: Pivot Counties and Congressional districts intersecting with Pivot Counties

Following the 2016 election, this district was one of 105 congressional districts that intersected with one or more Pivot Counties. These 206 Pivot Counties voted for Donald Trump (R) in 2016 after voting for Barack Obama (D) in 2008 and 2012.

The 206 Pivot Counties are located in 34 states. Iowa, with 31, had the most such counties. The partisan makeup of the 109 congressional districts intersecting with Pivot Counties was more Republican than the partisan breakdown of the U.S. House following the 2016 election. Of the 109 congressional districts that had at least one Pivot County, 64 percent were held by a Republican incumbent, while 55.4 percent of U.S. House seats were won by a Republican in the 2016 elections.[4]

Elections

2020

See also: South Carolina's 5th Congressional District election, 2020

General election

Democratic primary election

Republican primary election

The Republican primary election was canceled. Incumbent Ralph Norman advanced from the Republican primary for U.S. House South Carolina District 5.

Withdrawn or disqualified candidates

2018

See also: South Carolina's 5th Congressional District election, 2018

General election

Democratic primary election

Republican primary election

2017

U.S. House, South Carolina District 5 Special Election, 2017
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRalph Norman51%45,076
    Democratic Archie Parnell 47.9%42,341
    American Josh Thornton 0.4%319
    Libertarian Victor Kocher 0.3%273
    Green David Kulma 0.3%242
Total Votes88,316
Source: South Carolina Secretary of State
See also: South Carolina's 5th Congressional District special election, 2017

Republican Ralph Norman defeated Democrat Archie Parnell and three third-party candidates on June 20, 2017. The election replaced Mick Mulvaney (R), who was confirmed as director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget.[5] Compared to the tens of millions spent in Georgia's 6th Congressional District special election, which was held on the same day, fundraising and campaigning were more typical in South Carolina's 5th District. Norman raised $1.25 million between January and May, nearly double Parnell's $763,000 in contributions.[6]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 5 Special Election, 2017
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRalph Norman51%45,076
    Democratic Archie Parnell 47.9%42,341
    American Josh Thornton 0.4%319
    Libertarian Victor Kocher 0.3%273
    Green David Kulma 0.3%242
Total Votes88,316
Source: South Carolina Secretary of State

Ballotpedia compiled the following resources to help voters better understand the policy positions of the candidates prior to the Republican primary runoff election on May 16, 2017 and the general election on June 20, 2017, the same day as a special election runoff to fill the vacancy left by Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price representing Georgia's 6th Congressional District:


Primary elections were held on May 2, 2017, for the Democratic and Republican candidates. Archie Parnell won the Democratic primary, while Ralph Norman and Tommy Pope advanced to the Republican primary runoff held on May 16, 2017.[7][8][9]

Unofficial results from May 17 showed that Norman defeated Pope by 203 votes, 50.3 percent to 49.7 percent, in the runoff to win the Republican Party's nomination.[10] Following the certification of the election results by all relevant county election boards on May 18, the results automatically triggered a recount by the state of South Carolina. The recount took place on May 19, with official results showing that former Rep. Ralph Norman defeated Rep. Tommy Pope by a margin of 221 votes.[11][12][13]

South Carolina's 5th Congressional District has become a more solid Republican district in recent elections. Mick Mulvaney (R) originally won election to the district in 2010, defeating then-incumbent John Spratt (D) by 10.4 percent. Mulvaney then won re-election in 2012, 2014, and 2016 by margins of 11.1 percent, 21.3 percent, and 20.5 percent, respectively. The presidential vote in the district has followed the same trend in the past three presidential elections. President Donald Trump (R) won the district by 18.5 percent in 2016. Mitt Romney (R) won the district by 11.5 points in 2012, and John McCain (R) won the district by 11.2 percent in 2008.[14] Filing closed in the race on March 13, 2017. Fifteen candidates filed in the race: three Democrats, seven Republicans, and five third-party candidates.

Primary results

U.S. House, South Carolina District 5 Republican Runoff Primary, 2017
CandidateVote %Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngRalph Norman50.3%17,823
Tommy Pope 49.7%17,602
Total Votes35,425
Source:South Carolina Secretary of State
U.S. House, South Carolina District 5 Republican Primary, 2017
CandidateVote %Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngTommy Pope30.4%11,943
Green check mark transparent.pngRalph Norman30.1%11,808
Tom Mullikin 19.8%7,759
Chad Connelly 14.1%5,546
Sheri Few 4.9%1,930
Kris Wampler 0.5%197
Ray Craig 0.2%87
Total Votes39,270
Source:South Carolina Secretary of State

U.S. House, South Carolina District 5 Democratic Primary, 2017
CandidateVote %Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngArchie Parnell71.3%13,333
Alexis Frank 21.5%4,030
Les Murphy 7.2%1,346
Total Votes18,709
Source:South Carolina Secretary of State

2016

See also: South Carolina's 5th Congressional District election, 2016

Heading into the election, Ballotpedia rated this race as safely Republican. Incumbent Mick Mulvaney (R) defeated Fran Person (D) and Rudy Barnes Jr. (American) in the general election on November 8, 2016. Mulvaney defeated Ray Craig in the Republican primary, while Person ran unopposed in the Democratic primary. Barnes defeated Larry Gaither at the party convention. The primary elections took place on June 14, 2016.[8][15]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 5 General Election, 2016
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMick MulvaneyIncumbent59.2%161,669
    Democratic Fran Person 38.7%105,772
    American Rudy Barnes Jr. 2%5,388
    N/A Write-in 0.1%177
Total Votes273,006
Source:South Carolina Secretary of State

U.S. House, South Carolina District 5 Republican Primary, 2016
CandidateVote %Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngMick MulvaneyIncumbent78.3%22,603
Ray Craig 21.7%6,280
Total Votes28,883
Source:South Carolina Secretary of State

2014

See also: South Carolina's 5th Congressional District elections, 2014

The 5th Congressional District of South Carolina held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2014. Incumbent Mick Mulvaney (R) defeated Tom Adams (D) in the general election.

U.S. House, South Carolina District 5 General Election, 2014
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMick MulvaneyIncumbent60.6%103,078
    Democratic Tom Adams 39.3%66,802
    N/A Write-in 0%82
Total Votes169,962
Source:South Carolina State Election Commission

2012

See also: South Carolina's 5th Congressional District elections, 2012

The 5th Congressional District of South Carolina held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. Incumbent Mick Mulvaney won re-election in the district.[16]

2010
On November 2, 2010, Mick Mulvaney won election to the United States House. He defeated incumbent John Spratt (D) in the general election.[17]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 5 General Election, 2010
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMick Mulvaney55.2%125,834
    Democratic John Spratt incumbent44.8%102,296
    N/A Write-in 0%0
Total Votes228,130

2008
On November 4, 2008, John M. Spratt, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Albert F. Spencer (R) and Frank Waggoner (Constitution) in the general election.[18]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 5 General Election, 2008
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn M. Spratt, Jr.incumbent61.6%188,785
    Republican Albert F. Spencer 37%113,282
    Constitution Frank Waggoner 1.3%4,093
    N/A Write-in 0%125
Total Votes306,285

2006
On November 7, 2006, John M. Spratt, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Ralph Norman (R) in the general election.[19]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 5 General Election, 2006
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn M. Spratt, Jr.incumbent56.9%99,669
    Republican Ralph Norman 43.1%75,422
    N/A Write-in 0%63
Total Votes175,154

2004
On November 2, 2004, John M. Spratt, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Albert F. Spencer (R) in the general election.[20]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 5 General Election, 2004
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn M. Spratt, Jr.incumbent63%152,867
    Republican Albert F. Spencer 36.9%89,568
    N/A Write-in 0%83
Total Votes242,518

2002
On November 5, 2002, John M. Spratt, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Doug Kendall (L) and Steve Lefemine (Constitution) in the general election.[21]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 5 General Election, 2002
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn M. Spratt, Jr.incumbent85.9%121,912
    Libertarian Doug Kindall 7.8%11,013
    Constitution Steve Lefemine 6.3%8,930
    N/A Write-in 0.1%117
Total Votes141,972

2000
On November 7, 2000, John M. Spratt, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Carl L. Gullick (R) and Tom Campbell (L) in the general election.[22]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 5 General Election, 2000
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn M. Spratt, Jr.incumbent58.8%126,877
    Republican Carl L. Gullick 39.5%85,247
    Libertarian Tom Campbell 1.7%3,665
    N/A Write-in 0%49
Total Votes215,838

District map

Sours: https://ballotpedia.org/South_Carolina%27s_5th_Congressional_District


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