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Swizz Beatz discography

For a complete list of productions done by Swizz Beatz, see Swizz Beatz production discography.

Swizz Beatz discography
Swizz beatz at hot 97 summer jam 2007.jpg

Swizz Beatz performing at Hot 97's Summer Jam 2007

Studio albums2
Compilation albums1
Music videos6
Singles6
Soundtrack albums8

American rapper and producer Swizz Beatz has released two studio albums, one compilation album, one mixtape, thirty-nine singles (including thirty-one as a featured artist), three promotional singles and thirty-three music videos.

Studio albums[edit]

Compilation albums[edit]

Mixtapes[edit]

Singles[edit]

As lead artist[edit]

As featured artist[edit]

Promotional singles[edit]

Other charted songs[edit]

Guest appearances[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Swizz BeatzChart History: Billboard 200". Billboard. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  2. ^"Swizz Beatz Chart History: R&B/Hip-Hop Albums". Billboard. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  3. ^"Swizz Beatz Chart History: Rap Albums". Billboard. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  4. ^ ab"Presents G.H.E.T.T.O. Stories – Swizz Beatz". Billboard. Retrieved May 21, 2012.
  5. ^"Swizz Beatz Releases 'Monster Mondays Vol.1,' The Mixtape". Vibe. July 12, 2011.
  6. ^http://www.datpiff.com/Swizz-Beatz-Monster-Mondays-Vol-1-mixtape.250363.html
  7. ^"Swizz Beatz Album & Song Chart History: Hot 100". Billboard. Retrieved May 21, 2012.
  8. ^"Swizz Beatz Album & Song Chart History: R&B/Hip-Hop Songs". Billboard. Retrieved May 21, 2012.
  9. ^"Swizz Beatz Album & Song Chart History: Rap Songs". Billboard. Retrieved May 21, 2012.
  10. ^"Come and Get Me (feat. Cassidy) – Single by Swizz Beatz". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved November 21, 2012.
  11. ^"Stand Up (The Sean Bell Tribute Song) – Single by Swizz Beatz, Cassidy, Maino, Styles P, Talib Kweli & Drag-On". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved May 20, 2013.
  12. ^"Everyday (Coolin') [feat. Eve] – Single by Swizz Beatz". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved November 21, 2012.
  13. ^"International Party (feat. Alicia Keys) – Single by Swizz Beatz". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved November 21, 2012.
  14. ^"Street Knock (with A$AP Rocky) – Single by Swizz Beatz". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved November 21, 2012.
  15. ^"Everyday Birthday (feat. Chris Brown & Ludacris) – Single by Swizz Beatz". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved November 21, 2012.
  16. ^"VIBE Interview: Swizz Beatz Confirms 'Hands Up' Video (feat. Nicki Minaj, Lil Wayne, Rick Ross, 2 Chainz)". Vibe. July 2, 2013.
  17. ^https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/work-it-single/1274386133
  18. ^"Watch Ya Mouth (feat. Swizz Beatz) – Single by Busta Rhymes". Amazon Store. Amazon.com. Retrieved November 21, 2012.
  19. ^"I Do (feat. Swizz Beatz & Snoop Dogg) – Single by Lil Jon". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved November 21, 2012.
  20. ^"Stop the Party (Iron Man) [feat. Swizz Beatz] – Single by Busta Rhymes". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved November 21, 2012.
  21. ^"Red Dot Special (Rha-Ta-Ta-Ta) – Single by Spragga Benz". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved November 21, 2012.
  22. ^"Tip (feat. Swizz Beatz) – Single by The Rangers". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved November 21, 2012.
  23. ^"All We Know (feat. Ace Hood, Ray J, Swizz Beatz, Bow Wow & Fat Joe) – Single by DJ Absolut". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved September 25, 2013.
  24. ^https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/jason-feat.-swizz-beatz-single/id1048713229
  25. ^"AAAHHHH!!! (feat. Swizz Beatz) by Busta Rhymes". Apple Music.
  26. ^"Good Morning (feat. Pusha T, Swizz Beatz & Killer Mike) - Single by Black Thought on Apple Music". Retrieved August 28, 2020 – via Apple Music.
  27. ^"All I Do Is Win (Remix) [feat. T-Pain, Diddy, Nicki Minaj, Rick Ross, Busta Rhymes, Fabolous, Jadakiss, Fat Joe & Swizz Beatz] – Single by DJ Khaled". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved August 25, 2012.
  28. ^ abDiBella, M.F. "Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood – DMX > Overview". AllMusic. Retrieved February 24, 2013.
  29. ^LaVeck, Theresa E. "Let There Be Eve...Ruff Ryder's First Lady – Eve > Overview". AllMusic. Retrieved February 24, 2013.
  30. ^Phares, Heather. "Any Given Sunday [Original Soundtrack] – Original Soundtrack > Overview". AllMusic. Retrieved February 24, 2013.
  31. ^Conaway, Matt. "We Are the Streets – The LOX > Overview". AllMusic. Retrieved February 24, 2013.
  32. ^Birchmeier, Jason. "Space Age 4 Eva – Eightball & MJG > Overview". AllMusic. Retrieved February 24, 2013.
  33. ^Conaway, Matt. "Kiss tha Game Goodbye – Jadakiss > Overview". AllMusic. Retrieved February 24, 2013.
  34. ^Birchmeier, Jason. "The Rest Is History – Jin > Overview". AllMusic. Retrieved February 24, 2013.
  35. ^ abKellman, Andy. "I'm a Hustla – Cassidy > Overview". AllMusic. Retrieved February 24, 2013.
  36. ^Jeffries, David. "Like Father, Like Son [Bonus CD] – Birdman, Lil Wayne". AllMusic. Retrieved February 24, 2013.
  37. ^Jeffries, David. "Doctor's Advocate – Game". AllMusic. Retrieved February 24, 2013.
  38. ^Burmy. "N.O.R.E - Set It Off (Remix) ft. Busta, Kweli, Cassidy, & Red Cafe". DJBooth.net. The DJ Booth LLC. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  39. ^"Maino – Maino Is the Future // Free Mixtape". DatPiff. Idle Media Inc. 2008-10-06. Retrieved 2013-06-21.
  40. ^"Keep It Rockin – EP by Maino". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved February 26, 2012.
  41. ^Isenberg, Daniel (March 28, 2013). "Tracklist: N.O.R.E. "Student of the Game"". Complex. Complex Media. Retrieved March 28, 2013.
  42. ^"New Mixtape: Funkmaster Flex 'Who You Mad At? Me Or Yourself?'". Vibe. April 13, 2013. Retrieved April 13, 2013.
  43. ^"Ludacris - #IDGAF // Free Mixtape". DatPiff. Idle Media Inc. 2013-05-24. Retrieved 2013-05-24.
  44. ^Ryon, Sean (2013-10-06). "DJ Khaled "Suffering From Success" Release Date, Cover Art, Tracklisting". HipHop DX. Retrieved 2013-10-11.
  45. ^"New Video: Reek Da Villian 'Go Off' Feat. Kendrick Lamar, Ace Hood & Swizz Beatz". Vibe. June 22, 2014.
  46. ^"Birds in the Trap Sing McKnight – Travis Scott > Overview". AllMusic.
  47. ^"BIG BAD... by Giggs". Apple Music. Retrieved February 22, 2019.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swizz_Beatz_discography

Many of our staff have witnessed her lingering in front of the Hot 97 offices at all hours of the day and night. Her repeated, uninvited presence in front of our facilities has made our employees extremely uncomfortable and anxious. We are seeking an order of protection so that Ms. Saunders will keep away from our offices and staff.

Flex appears to have mellowed since then, and with me he talked about how the decline of the small-time drug business was hurting hip-hop by introducing a “persistent, annoying” element into the industry. “People who can’t make a fast buck on the corner anymore, now they think maybe the music business is a fast buck,” he said. “And why wouldn’t they think it’s a fast buck? It’s on Letterman, it’s on MTV, it’s in Forbes magazine—how much Jay-Z, a person who used to sell drugs, makes. Biggie, a person who used to sell drugs. Suge Knight. Eazy-E. Hot 97 never glorified that. Never. That was always glorified by VH1 ‘Behind the Music.’ ”

The eviction suit, with its emphasis on the station’s physical plant, its occupying a particular space, comes at a time when more and more stations across the country have opted to become disembodied voices. The rise of satellite companies (Sirius and XM) and Web sites such as MySpace, along with the continued effects of F.C.C. deregulation, appear to be threatening the relevance of “local” broadcasting. (Clear Channel, which is based in San Antonio, produces ostensibly personalized voice tracks for its regional affiliates across the country.) What’s more, the troubles at Hot 97 have coincided with a decline in the importance of New York in the larger hip-hop landscape. Southern rap now dominates the album-sales charts, as well as radio playlists—to the dismay of New York-based artists, who feel betrayed by their local d.j.s. (“If you gonna play in your back yard, you should be playing your back-yard music,” Gravy says. “Sometimes it’s not about the money, it’s about the principle—you from New York.”)

As a way of maintaining street credibility—hip-hop’s Holy Grail—in such an environment, Hot 97 has adopted a defiant business strategy that consists, in effect, of converting its production facility into a stage set of the hood, and, as often as possible, calling attention to its home and the guest stars who drop by. “We don’t emulate the life style; we are the life style, because of the people we continually bring into the building,” the station’s programming director, John Dimick, once said. “At any given time, artists and listeners are hanging around the station and people are handing out mix disks in front of the station.”

In the aftermath of the Gravy shooting, however, the district council enforced a complete ban on visitors to the seventh floor: no interviews, no freestyles, no FedEx messengers. It took less than a week for Emmis to file a countersuit, for breach of contract, arguing that such “astoundingly draconian restrictions” were tantamount to putting Hot 97 out of business.

The two sides met in New York State Supreme Court, on Centre Street, where Brian O’Dwyer tried explaining a little street lingo to the judge, Bernard Fried, who is sixty-five: “If Your Honor may or may not be aware, as part of the culture of the artists, they travel with a great number of people who are called ‘posses.’ I’m learning about this myself these days.”

Eric Heichel, speaking for Emmis, in turn asked, “Is it reasonable to assume the Federal Express man is suddenly becoming a threat to security?”

Judge Fried granted a temporary restraining order against the district council and its restrictive policy. Hot 97 was free for the interim to resume inviting guests, on the condition that they come alone—artist plus zero. The two sides have since been working on a settlement that would preclude Fried’s addressing the bigger question of the “ejection action.” (“It’s really dangerous to think out loud, but I’m going to do it,” Fried advised. “Why can’t you, as a means of providing a solution here, require that the artist meet one of your representatives at a location someplace else in New York City, and that artist, together with the single representative or two other people, travels by New York City taxicab to the location, so that you don’t have a situation where the posses are accumulating?”)

Hot 97 producers put together a prideful jingle, set to the tune of P. Diddy’s “Bad Boy for Life.” It went, “We ain’t goin’ nowhere. We can’t be stopped now. ’Cause it’s Hudson for Life.”

With the resumption of live interviews, seventh-floor domestic concerns, such as the protection of the carpet, returned to the fore. (Signs taped to the doors warn of a five-hundred-dollar fine for eating in the studio.) The R. & B. artist Brooke Valentine dropped by on a Sunday evening to discuss her dating preferences (“He got to be chocolate but he can’t be purple: I want to be able to see him when I pick him up at night”), and a couple of weeks later Jay-Z paid a visit, which Angie Martinez announced with fanfare. “El Presidente!” she said, describing his arrival for her listeners’ benefit. “He’s currently doing his Presidential wave.” To her guest, she said, “Take your jacket off, relax.”

“Gonna get comfy and cozy, like this my home,” he replied.

They talked briefly about current events. “I was meeting with Bill Gates, telling him about Hot 97 last week,” Jay-Z said. “He told me about what the world’s going to look like in five years, and I got scared. He’s just extra smart. I don’t even want to get into it.”

Martinez mentioned an article in The Economist, “Bubbles and Bling,” in which the managing director of Cristal, the champagne producer, had been quoted expressing only lukewarm “curiosity and serenity” about the attention that American rappers bring to the brand.

“Cristal is done—finished,” Jay-Z said, calling for a boycott. “How’s that for a slap in the face?. . . I know I bought about fifty thousand cases in my lifetime, personally.”

Martinez steered the discussion back to the day’s big news: in honor of the tenth anniversary of “Reasonable Doubt,” which Hot 97 had made famous, Jay-Z would be playing a special concert at Radio City Music Hall—“and we have your tickets. This is the only place on the planet that can hook you up right now.”

She wanted to know what brand of champagne they should have ready for him at the show, if not Cristal. “Dom Rosé is great,” Jay-Z replied. “Can you get me some Dom Rosé?”

The interview, which generated international news as word of the proposed boycott spread, turned out to be a brilliant exercise in cross-branding and mutual promotion.

That afternoon, Fatman Scoop, another d.j. at the station, told a boastful anecdote that seemed meant especially to needle the carpenters. “There was a time Mary J. Blige was in the area,” he said. “She had to go to the bathroom, so she came up to Hot 97. She didn’t even do an interview. She just came up to use the bathroom. That’s how connected we are. It’s Hot 97.”

Gravy’s closest business associate, a producer named Fendi, has made a series of DVDs, entitled “The Come Up,” depicting the hip-hop life style in a raunchy fashion that makes Hot 97 seem almost Disneyfied. The footage is loosely assembled, and culled from home videos and concert films. (One bit, from the 2004 Summer Jam, shows audience members and 50 Cent’s G-Unit throwing chairs and bottles at one another.) Guns and drugs figure prominently.

A recent edition features a scene shot last year, before Gravy’s feud with Hot 97, and shortly after he and Fendi had negotiated to take their private label, Dirty Money Records, to Warner Bros., for a reported three million dollars. It is night, and Gravy and Ice-T are standing on Eighth Street, in the Village—a young rapper on the cusp of success, basking in the attention of an elder statesman. “We just chilling,” Ice-T says. “I bumped into Gravy. Say, ‘What’s happening?’ We talking.”

“We gone got the official Gangsta Man,” Gravy says. “You can’t get more gangsta than this man right here, you know?. . . Tell me, what you got going on, Ice-T?”

“Right now, I’m on TV—niggas watching me on ‘Law and Order: Special Victims Unit,’ cause I’m the real mothafuckin’ pimp,” Ice-T says. “Playing the police. Imagine that. That’s real pimpin’ for a street nigga like me.”

Ice-T mentions that he’s got a new album coming out (“Gangsta Rap”), along with a clothing line (310 Motoring) and an energy drink (Liquid Ice) to promote: “I’m just trying to get it all, man. I’m trying to stay in the game.”

Gravy, nodding along, is wearing three huge silver necklaces, with crosses dangling in front of his stomach. “My man, shit, let me check out how you roll,” he says, turning and pointing behind Ice-T to a silver luxury car.

“Yeah, this the Bentley,” Ice-T says, before directing the camera to the front seat, where he shows off a customized steering wheel. “Got a lot of wood up in there. You go check niggas’ Bentleys out, you ain’t even going to see the wood steering wheel, ’cause that’s extra. That cost five thousand. . . . But I got it from hard work.”

Ice-T turns serious. “The hardest thing in the world to get is street respect, where niggas really are happy to see you with this type of stuff, you dig? That’s the hardest thing to obtain, is to get it, and have the hood feel like you deserve it, you dig? ’Cause you can go out there, get a budget, and get a whole bunch of money—niggas will run right up in your crib and repossess that bullshit, real quick. Look, look, look— ”

Sours: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2006/07/10/where-hip-hop-lives
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Hot 97 Hip Hop & R&B 2001 Vol 17

HOT 97 2001 BLAZING HIP HOP & R&B Volume 17: The Best Hip Hop & R&B sereis comes back with a wicked mix for Summer 2001 featuring all the latest hips ripping up the US, Jamaica, and the World.  Features the smash hits "Get It" by R P Diddy & Crew, "Freak On" by Missy, "Ho" by Ludacris, and much much more!!!!

 

1. LETS GET DIRTY - REDMAN FEAT DJ KOOL
2. POV ANTHEM - TAH MURDAH
3. THIS IS WHAT IT IS RIGHT NOW - BUSTA RHYMES
4. SO WATCHA SAYING - BEANIE SEGAL & MEMPHIS BLEEK
5. GET IT - 6 DEP, P DIDDY, BLACK ROB
6. 4 DEADLY MCS - BIG PUN, NOTORIOUS B.I.G, 2 PAC, BIG L
7. LADIES & GENTS - ANGIE MARTINEZ FEAT SNOOP DOG
8. THE BEST U CAN - THE LIKS
9. HO - LUDACRIS
10. BK ANTHEM - FOXY BROWN
11. LICKSHOT - MISSY ELLIOT
12. FREAK ON (REMIX) - MISSY FEAT NELLY FORTADO
13. RIDE WITH ME - NELLY
14. BONNIE & SHYNE - SHYNE FEAT BARRINGTON LEVY
15. WHAT COULD BE BETTER - RANJAZ FEAT MEMPHIS BLEEK
16. I CRY - JARUL FEAT LIL MO
17. GOOD LIFE (REMIX) - FAITH EVANS FEAT JA RULE
18. CAN'T BELIEVE IT - FAITH EVANS, CARL THOMAS, SHYNE
19. I DON'T KNOW - USHER FEAT P DIDDY
20. THERE SHE GOES - BABYFACE
Sours: http://www.musicfreakcentral.com/compactdiscs/tracklists/hot97vol17.html
Funkmaster Flex Spins The 90's Live From HOT97 Radio

Hot 97 vol. 140 Blazin Hip Hop & RNB Official CD

$9.00Buy It Now3d 16h, FREE Shipping, 30-Day Returns, eBay Money Back Guarantee

Seller:numixtapesofficial✉️(609)99.1%, Location:Wesley Chapel, Florida, Ships to: US & many other countries, Item:293745687437Hot 97 vol. 140 Blazin Hip Hop & RNB Official CD. Hot 97 Vol. 140 Blazin Hip Hop & RNB Official CD 1. A Boogie Wit da Hoodie, Don Q & Trap Manny - Vroom Vroom2. B.O.B. - After Hourzzz3. Big Sean - Harder Than My Demons4. Busta Rhymes ft Vybz Kartel - The Don & The Boss5. Casanova - Stress6. City Girls ft Doja Cat - Kitty Talk7. DaBaby - BILLBOARD BABY8. Dave East ft Trey Songz - The City9. Migos - Racks 2 Skinny10. Nas - King's Disease11. NeYo & Jeremih - U 2 Luv12. Pop Smoke ft A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie - Hello13. SZA ft. Ty Dolla $ign - Hit Different 14. Teyana Taylor - Bare Wit Me15. The Lox ft DMX - Bout Shit16. Ty Dolla $ign feat. Nicki Minaj - Expensive17. Ty Dolla Sign ft Kanye West, FKA Twigs & Skrillex - Ego Death18. Wale - B.Y.G.P.W. (Colors)19. Wiz Khalifa - Slim Peter20. Young M.A - Bad Bitch AnthemCondition:Brand New, Restocking Fee:No, Return shipping will be paid by:Buyer, All returns accepted:Returns Accepted, Item must be returned within:30 Days, Refund will be given as:Money Back, Features:Compilation, Format:CD, Release Title:Hot 97, Country/Region of Manufacture:United States, Case Type:Plastic Slipcover, Language:English, Artist:Various Artist, Release Year:2020, Style:East Coast, Genre:Rap & Hip-Hop, Case Condition:Excellent (EX)

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(Classic)🏅Funkmaster Flex- Saturday Night Street Jam (1994) Hot 97 NYC

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